Categories
Careers Industry Flexers

Jobs At Supermarkets And Measures Taken During The Covid-19 Pandemic

Supermarket Information

The supermarkets are recruiting. Mainly temporary roles but some permanent too. During this time of massive change and restrictions we rely heavily upon the food industry to ensure we have a steady supply of food. As people need to self isolate (including supermarket employees) the supermarkets are trying to ensure they have the people needed to manufacture, distribute and sell the food.

Below you will find some information on where to find the jobs, store opening hours, latest brand news and the special hours for NHS workers and the vulnerable.

Please remember that as this situation is rapidly evolving, some of the following news, guidance and roles may have changed. For advice on self isolation, social distancing and the latest NHS and government advice and restrictions please always check official sources:

NHS: Click Here

Gov: Click Here

ASDA

OPENING HOURS: Reduced opening hours, check your local store here

NHS workers 8am – 9am Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays

Elderley & Vulnerable: No stated hours but where possible people in this category must self isolate.

 

ASDA JOBS: click here.

NEWS: News from Asda and what they are doing to support and help communities and colleagues, click here.

 

MORRISONS

OPENING HOURS: Store opening times: Monday – Saturday 8am – 8pm. Store finder here.

NHS Workers can shop 7am – 8am, Monday – Saturday

Elderley & Vulnerable: No stated hours but where possible people in this category must self isolate.

 

MORRISONS JOBS:

Cheshire: Gadbrook Produce Manufacturing site

UK, Temporary Home Delivery Opportunities

UK, Logistics, Food & Catering

NEWS: News from Morrisons.

 

Tesco

OPENING HOURS: Store opening times

NHS workers Can browse and fill their basket up to one hour before opening on a Sunday.

Elderly and Vulnerable: Tesco will prioritise one hour every Monday, Wednesday and Friday morning between 9-10am (except in our Express stores), but where possible people in this category must self isolate.

 

TESCO JOBS: Tesco careers

NEWS: Tesco expects further recruitment to take place in the coming weeks. Read about Tesco’s efforts here.

 

Sainsburys

OPENING HOURS: Store opening times, Monday – Saturday 8am -8pm, Sunday as usual.

Store Locator.

NHS workers have a dedicated hour Monday, Wednesday and Friday 8am – 9am

Elderley & vulnerable: Monday, Wednesday and Friday 8am – 9am. However people in this category should be self isolating.

 

SAINSBURY’S JOBS: Find Sainsbury’s jobs here.

NEWS: Read more about what Sainsbury’s are doing here. Sainsbury’s News

 

Marks & Spencer

OPENING HOURS: Store opening hours here

NHS workers have first hour of trading on Tuesdays and Fridays

Elderley & vulnerable: First hour of trading on Mondays and Thursdays. However people in this category should be self isolating.

 

M&S JOBS: Find Jobs Here.

NEWS: Information from M&S.

 

THE NHS ARE SEEKING VOLUNTEERS TO HELP OVERCOME THIS CRISIS

IF YOU CAN HELP REGISTER HERE

 

As always we have lots of roles waiting for applications on our flexible working jobs board. Jump over to our search page here….

Flexible Job Search Click Here
Categories
Flexible Working

Home Working And How Do It

10 Ways To Work From Home During The Coronavirus Pandemic

Coronavirus is making the country take drastic measures. The aim is to preserve the safety of the vulnerable and attempt to prevent our NHS from being overwhelmed. Guess what? Home working has been fully advised where possible. 

Our team has been home working since our beginnings back in 2017, so we thought we’d share a few tips to help you on your way through this challenging time, but even for us we face the challenge of possibly having to juggle work and entertaining / teaching our kids at home too.

So here goes…

  • Plan – Spend some time just planning your work. It may feel like precious time wasted but it is totally worth it. By planning you can prioritise your work and aim to keep to a schedule. Personally I find the best time to do this is on a Friday afternoon (in an attempt to keep weekends free for family time). Make use of tools like Trello and Asana or if you prefer just use a good old diary! 
  • If you are going to be home working with your partner and have kids at home then work in shifts. We may have to accept that one takes an early shift working with an early start and then the other takes a late shift to work with a later finish, swapping over the childcare.
  • Where possible try to find your home working space. Your office, the dining table, a summer house, the bedroom just somewhere you can hopefully get some quiet time to work. Make sure that area is clear before you sit down to work.
  • If you’re flying solo with kids at home then there is no doubt it’s going to be a tough few months. Although schools aren’t yet closed, coronavirus may force them to close soon. So, accept that you are not going to be firing on all cylinders. Prioritise your work. Don’t book calls in consecutively, space them out. Avoid cabin fever by getting out for a walk at some point in the day. Don’t get hung up by mess or chores. They will get done just maybe not as quickly as you are used too.
  • Avoid social media whilst you are home working (unless you are a social media manager, then you just have to be super disciplined!). Social media can be very distracting and before you know it, you’ve wasted a significant amount of time. Turn OFF your notifications.
  • Check in with your team. Communication is key to efficient and productive home working. Preferably 3 times a week or more if you are full time. Use tools such as Zoom, Google Hangouts, Microsoft Teams, the good old telephone and Slack to keep lines of communication open. Perhaps establish reasonable hours of the day to communicate with each other so that nobody is expected to answer a call in the evening if that is deemed unreasonable.
  • Take a break. It’s ok to take a break. Especially if you are wrestling with kids at home too. Do work in bitesize chunks where possible, try to incorporate that into your planning.
  • If you are trying to homeschool as well as home working then be realistic. You cannot possibly achieve the same output as a full time school whilst working. Break up the day into school time and work time. However it works for you, but don’t (unless you have older kids who can study with little supervision) try to do both at the same time. Stick to shorter lessons and only one or two a day. Utilise resources such as Twinkl or check out this fabulous lady and read her advice: Erin Loechner OtherGoose.com. I also saw this useful list from a facebook group that may be worth checking out.
  • BACK UP YOUR WORK REGULARLY! 
  • Make sure you are adhering to data protection and security laws. Make sure you have the latest security software installed on your device. Ensure access to your device is password protected and encrypted to prevent unauthorised access if the device is stolen, misplaced or hacked. If you’re accessing your work network whilst home working, make sure access is secure. Check with your employer that they have covered this with your team.

Coronavirus may be disrupting our day to day life but we will get through this. It’s a challenge yes, but hopefully our communities will come together and work to support one another. Look after your elderly or vulnerable neighbours. We are strong and capable and work best when we work together.

Keep up to date with the NHS latest information and guidance on Coronavirus here. NHS

If you are responsible for a team or are a business trying to make remote working work for you, then our trusted friends Ursula Tavender and Liese Lord have put together this fab resource: Get it here.

Categories
Business Careers Flexible Working

What Is Flexible Working?

The issue with answering this question is that flexible working means different things for different people. So many terms can describe types of flexible working and what works for one person could be totally off the table for another. 

However we will attempt to summarise ‘What Is Flexible Working’. 

Essentially it is a work pattern that accommodates the needs of the employee whilst maintaining the business needs of the company. It is a symbiotic relationship. You cannot have one without the other.

It can fall into a few different categories often with different names. The Find Your Flex Group use the 6 pillars.

The Six Pillars Of Flexible Working

  • FT Flexi Start & Finish TImes
  • Part Time
  • Remote Working
  • Compressed Hours
  • Job Share
  • Term Time Only

Flexi Start and Finish Times

Employees work allocated hours but can choose at what time to start and what time to finish. Many businesses make this work by having core hours that everyone has to be in for.

Part Time

Part time hours for those who can’t or don’t want to work full time. For this group of people it’s really important that are considered as important as their full time counterparts. Many part timers are just as ambitious as full timers.

Remote Working

Working in a location other than the main office. It could be at home or in a shared working environment.

Compressed Hours

Working an allocated number of hours across a compressed time period. For example full time over 4 days. Conversely, some may wish to work part time hours but over 5 days for example. Some employers choose to have a core day for meetings that everyone must be in for.

Job Share

A role that has the requirement for full time hours is split between 2 employees. It could be a 50:50 split or an alternative split such as 75:25.

Term Time Only

The required weekly / monthly hours are only worked during term time. Allowing parents to manage school holidays without the need to rely on paid help or favours.

There are so many benefits to facilitating these patterns of work. To read more, why not download our Tips To Implementing Flexible Working.

Flexible working is more frequently in the news today with campaigners such as Helen Whately, Joeli Braerly and Anna Whitehouse. In our next post we discuss the current state and future of flexible working.

Perhaps you are ready to #SignUpToFlex… Contact us today.

Categories
Business

How To Write A Good Job Description

We don’t need to tell you how important first impressions are, and a job description is the first introduction potential hires will get into your company. So, never underestimate its importance. 

A good job description should be straightforward, clear and easy to follow. It’s essentially the first stage of the recruitment process, so it plays a very important role in gathering a group of potential candidates. Take the time to get it right.

Here’s Some Of Our Top Tips To Write The Perfect Job Description:

The Job Title 

Make sure the job title is an accurate description of what the job entails. Think of it as an attention-grabbing headline. It’s what will draw the candidate in, so it’s arguably the most prominent point. Avoid obscure titles; job descriptions are not the place for creative writing, doing so you risk alienating people, meaning you could lose out on the perfect candidate. Think about the job titles people will search for.

Explain The Position

Paint a picture of your company, the team and the types of projects they’ll be working on.  It’s important to get the balance right here; you don’t want to waffle but you do want to provide enough information, so that the potential hire can engage with it. Too little info and your description could be overlooked. Too much and the candidate will lose interest or overlook important points.

The Working Environment

Be sure to talk about the working environment, so that potential hires can visualise themselves within it, whether that’s quirky offices based in Camden, an industrial centre, a call centre or a home-based role. Will it be quiet or noisy and full of buzz? Will the employee need to operate any equipment as part of the role or do any heavy lifting? Is travel required? These details let the candidate know what to expect and whether the job is a good match for them. 

Location & Flexibility 

Being clear about the location of the role is really important. It sounds obvious, but lack of clarity could eliminate the perfect hire.  State the geographical location of the role, but if you would consider flexibility and remote-working, spell this out. Thanks to technology and the way the world works these days, location doesn’t need to be a barrier to finding your perfect hire. 

Similarly, state if you’re open to flexible working patterns and discussions, so that it doesn’t become a sticking point for candidates at interview stage. But, be sure you are equipped to follow through with these promises of adopting flexible working practices.

Focus On Skills In The Job Description

Spell out the top three to four skills you expect your candidates to have. These are the key ingredients to the role and the bare minimum that’s required.  Missing one of these is like missing a key ingredient from a recipe.

Qualifications And Education

Don’t underestimate the importance of qualifications and education; it needs careful consideration. It’s clearly important to have the “must haves” in your description but be careful not to include something that would be an advantage, unless of course you highlight it as that. If you’d happily consider someone who has years or practical experience, spell this out in your description. 

Day-To-Day Duties

Candidates will want to know what their work life would look like on a daily basis, so explain the day-to-day duties of the job. Make sure this important point is included in the job description.

Success 

Tell your potential candidates what’s expected of them and what success looks like in your company. What standards will they be expected to meet if you bring them on board. 

Salary In The Job Description

Include the compensation package in the job description, even if it’s a range or salary band. “Salary dependant on experience” won’t generate the same amount of interest.  From a candidate’s point of view, no mention of salary, implies that the employer either doesn’t know or doesn’t value the outputs the role produces.  Why would they waste their time applying for a role that could possibly pay way under what they feel they should earn? Consequently qualified candidates who are potentially the right fit for the role could dismiss the role. 

Other Points To Keep In Mind When Writing A Job Description

Keep language friendly and gender-neutral, write in the first person e.g. “You will be proficient in…”, proof-read and spell check. 

When you write a job description read it out loud and ensure it makes sense. If there’s any point that doesn’t flow properly or is tricky to understand it, change it. If you don’t understand it, no-one else will.  Test the description; ask people in your business or organisation to read it before it goes live. Chances are that someone else, who is not as close to it as you are, will spot something you won’t!

Avoid long paragraphs and lengthy descriptions, candidates will lose interest. Keep the job description clear, concise and spell out the main points.

Want to know more about why you should work with The Find Your Flex Group, check out our stats here.

Categories
Careers Industry Flexers Technology Industry

The Step Into Tech Programme – Women In Technology

An Interview with Sue Mosley, HR Business Partner BBC, Design & Engineering.

The Women ‘Stepping Into Tech’

The Step Into Tech Programme focuses on getting more women in technology careers. The pilot consisted of 14 weeks training. Including an intense week in Manchester, one evening per week in Manchester and additional home learning with support. The course was part time. Programme two is underway attracting around 900 applicants from London alone.

We love to celebrate the organisations who are getting things right when it comes to women in technology. Sometimes organisations do get things wrong. Like so many the BBC had a significant issue with the gender pay gap. Sue Mosley tells us how the BBC have learned from findings. She talks about what they are doing to encourage more women to embark on careers in technology.

The Interview.

What were the key drivers that led to the development of the ‘Step Into Tech’ programme?

Current stats tell us that the tech industry has an average of 17% females. Software engineering is a profession that is hugely male dominated, and the UK’s is facing a digital skills crisis.

If we want to fix the skills gap, then we as organisations need to be more imaginative in the ways of attracting talent and provide opportunities for progression. We also need to ensure that we’re always striving to have as diverse a workforce as possible. We need to make sure that we continue to be creative, foster innovation and serve our diverse audience.  

The pilot programme was a huge success. What were the key findings or successes?

The success of programme one is down to so many factors. It isn’t just about running a part-time training programme. It is essential that all the participants on the programme are fully committed to learn. That they are passionate about progressing a career within the profession. The measure of success was based on who completed training and then progressed into a role within software engineering and at the BBC.

The delivery of the training had to be adaptable to everyone’s different learning styles. It was essential that the cohort felt part of the BBC throughout their training . This is instrumental in encouraging them to want to progress their careers with us! 

The BBC Step into Tech programme has 16 places. From the first assessment session of 47 shortlisted applicants, it was a real challenge to select 16. The calibre of the individuals was superb as so many of them demonstrated the attributes we were looking for. We could have quite easily run 2 programmes at the same time! 

Do you think the UK will see more programmes like ‘Step Into Tech’ over the next few years?

I’d like to think so, as there is most definitely an appetite for them.  I know of one other organisation who already run a very similar programme. Knowing how successful that programme was and consulting with them, this is really how our Step into Tech programme came about.

There is a huge appetite from individuals who clearly want to learn, develop skills and change career paths. This is a great pool of talent to tap into. The BBC and other organisations can provide those opportunities for this talent pool and help fix the digital skills crisis as well as supporting diversity initiatives.

The ‘Step Into Tech’ programme focuses on women taking their firs steps into a career in tech. What about the career returners. Those who previously found a tech career lacked the flexibility they needed or was too male dominated? Can programmes like the ‘Step Into Tech’ be replicated and adapted to suit returners?

Yes of course they can, many of the aspects on the programme also focused on personal development too. This focus proved really beneficial to some of the cohort. Especially those who were just embarking on that return to work after a career break. So long as those individuals can demonstrate they have the qualities that make a good software engineer, then the programme can suit any individual. Regardless of whether they are a career returner or otherwise, in terms of the flexibility around working.

At the BBC we have a significant number of software engineers who have flexible working. 

With technology advancing the digital skills gap is becoming a serious concern for organisations. What role do you think women have to play in filling this digital skills gap?

Women definitely have a huge role to play in helping bridge some of the digital skills gaps. Currently in the UK there are 427,000 professional women alone who want to return to work at some point. Of those women, 3 in 5 return to lower skilled or lower paid jobs following those career breaks.  Therefore, organisations need to be more creative in their approach to talent attraction. They should be open to offering re-training opportunities as well as flexible working options.

11 out of 16 women from our first Step into Tech programme secured roles in our Design + Engineering division as software engineers. All these women came from very different professions i.e. teaching, medical, admin, legal etc; and this was through the creative approach we adopted. 

Read more on the role of women in technology and closing the digital skills gap in our other post. Read about 23 Code Street and how they are teaching women to code.

Categories
Business Careers Technology Industry

The Flexers Who Can Help Close The Digital Skills Gap

What is The Fourth Industrial Revolution?

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is in full swing and it’s not slowing down. But what does that mean? What is the Digital Skills Gap? What impact will it have on women, their careers and flexible working? ‘4IR’ as it’s also known is the term for the way disruptive technologies are radically changing our lives. It’s the merging of our biological, physical, digital and technological worlds. Artificial intelligence (AI), Robotics, The Internet Of Things (IOT) and Virtual Reality (VR) are fast becoming an essential part of our social and economic lives. 

These changes are disrupting the business sector at an unprecedented pace. There is no denying these technologies will provide immense benefits to society. Conversely however they present huge challenges.

There is a fear that technology such as AI and robotics are replacing humans in the workplace. However, there will be strong demand for technical skills like programming, app development and skills that aren’t so easy for computers to master. Skills such as creative thinking, problem-solving and negotiating. Let’s explore this further.

The Digital Skills Gap

Here is the problem. Technology is advancing fast. Faster than many businesses can keep up with. The Digital Skills Gap is a real concern. As new categories of jobs emerge, they will partly or wholly displace others. Technology is only as good as the people developing and managing it. Businesses need to have people with the right digital skills to maintain business growth. 

Nearly 50% of companies in the WE Forum Study, expect that automation will lead to some reduction in their full-time workforce by 2022. 38% of businesses expect to extend their workforce to new productivity-enhancing roles. More than a quarter expect automation to lead to creation of new roles in their enterprise.

142,000 vacant tech jobs by 2023, 22% of which will be new types of STEM roles

A large study by EDF and the Social Market Foundation (2017) state that there will be 142,000 new jobs in science, research, engineering and technology from now until 2023. Demand for software engineers is rising quickly. Machine learning and data science fields, recorded 191% and 136% growth respectively since 2015. However another study, People Power by The City & Guilds Group (2018) found that 32% of employers struggle to recruit for specialist roles such as engineers, marketing and IT Staff, digital analysts.

The WE Forum Future Of Jobs (2018) found that technology adoption features highly in the growth strategy of companies. But the skills gap features heavily as a barrier. 

The following are considered by (2018) and The WEF Future Of Jobs (2018) to be amongst jobs with the largest hiring growth.

  • Software engineers 
  • Project managers, 
  • Marketing specialists 
  • Data Analysts and Scientists, 
  • Software and Applications Developers
  • Ecommerce specialists
  • Social Media Specialists 

Essentially they are roles that significantly involve technology. Yet the skills required to perform these jobs are also identified as ‘skills amongst the skills gaps’ by Linkedin.

How Do We Address The Digital Skills Gap?

So what do we do about this digital skills gap? Who is going to fill the gap? Do we focus on children and encouraging interest in STEM fields? How can we help schools prepare our future workers with skills in emerging technologies. Consider numerous roles within the technology sector didn’t exist when many of us where at school. 

Do we focus on the massive pool of parents. In particular the women who have so much to potential in terms of talent and commitment. The same women who wish to acquire the digital skills in demand. Parents that need support and guidance with career changes. The same people that seek flexible working opportunities. Let the demand from workers seeking flexible working meet the demand to plug the digital skills gap.

Remote working and other flexible working options are becoming increasingly popular and manageable. Thankfully, for parents who have put a career on hold because of crippling childcare costs and the nine to five inflexible working day; there is a future. However more work is needed to help businesses cope with these changes. They need to be equipped with the resources to manage a flexible working team.

The Winners Changing The Future Of Women Globally

only 15% of people working in STEM roles in the UK are female.

The percentage of women in STEM related careers is low. The tech industry offers opportunities for in demand flexible working conditions. It seems clear that this is an area for businesses to make positive developments.

It’s early days in terms of changes. But there are companies running successful schemes for returners. Returner programmes aim to encourage those who have had career breaks to return. People who have years of experience but just need to up skill and build on their confidence.

There are forward thinking organisations such as the BBC. The ‘Step Into Tech Programme’ proving a huge success. No previous experience needed just a thirst for learning and tech.

Lots of new companies such as Tech Pixies, 23 Code Street, Digital Mums and Tech Returners have emerged in recent years. They are helping train women in tech skills such as coding, programming and social media management. Then there is  The Tech Talent Charter. This industry collective are supported in the government’s policy paper on the UK Digital Strategy. They aim to bring together industries and organisations to drive diversity and address gender imbalance in technology roles.

The technology is there. The desire and passion is there. Career returners and career changers are willing. We just need to connect the dots.

Look out for more posts on this subject as we discuss ‘Women in tech’, ‘The future of the technological workplace’, ‘Coding for mums – by 23 Code Street’ and more.

Whilst you’re waiting for these fabulous reads, why not check out our flexible tech roles on our flexible working jobs board?

Categories
Lifestyle

Top 6 Wellbeing Apps

The Wellbeing Apps You Can Do Every Day

Wellbeing apps can provide an easy, quick way to work in mindfulness, exercise and training into busy lifestyles. Our bodies and minds are key to functioning at a happier and more productive level. A healthy mind needs to co exist with a healthy body for all round wellbeing.

Here are our top picks from wellbeing apps for ios and android on the market today.

Calm – Meditation and Sleep

This wellbeing app is for reducing stress and encouraging meditation. It’s an all round winner in the reviews.  4.7 / 5 from 74.4K Ratings on ios. Complete bitesize meditations or longer sessions to really find your focus. Learn the skill of meditation, get more restful sleep and watch videos on mindful movements and gentle stretching and listen.

Headspace Meditation & Sleep

Think calmer, happier and relaxed. This app focuses on helping you train your mind and body through relaxation and mindfulness. 4.8 / 5 from over 179K reviews on ios.

Seven – 7 Minute Workout

Yes, just 7 minutes. No fancy equipment needed. Simple but effective workouts that can be squeezed into a busy schedule. Start the day with a burst of energy or shaking off the stresses of the day early evening. This wellbeing app gains 4.7 / 5 from 25.2K reviews

Peak – Play Smarter

The wellbeing app to challenge your brain. Give your brain a regular workout and keep those grey cells active. Neuroplasticity is a concept that believes your brain health can be weakened and strengthened. Using your cognitive skills regularly helps to strengthen your brain. So don’t just train your body, train your brain too for optimal health. This app gains 4.7 / 5, from 93.6K ratings.

One You Couch To 5K – Running for beginners

A flexible programme to work around one of the flexible jobs on our jobs board! Work up to running 5k at your own pace at a time that suits you. Works alongside your favourite music player automatically dipping the volume so you can hear instructions.

Breethe: Sleep & Meditation

Guided meditations to help you destress and sleep better in bitesize sessions. Inhale happiness with Breethe. Also features a full 12-week daily program to learn to meditate and progressively bring more calm and clarity into your life. Scoring 4.8 / 5, from 22K ratings.

Now you’re feeling ready to take on the world with your optimism and healthy mind, search for your next flexible working role on our jobs board.

Maybe you need some help with writing your CV…Check this article out.

Need some tips for refocusing and getting back on track? Then read 11 Ways To A Positive Mind.

Categories
Careers

Transferable Skills

Top 10 Transferable Skills

Writing A CV Using Transferable Skills

Writing a CV after a career break or a career change can be tricky task. Our post about how to approach writing a CV after a career break discusses what you need to consider when writing your CV. But, in this post we wanted to dig deeper into discussing ‘what are transferable skills’.

What Are Transferable Skills?

Transferable Skills:

Skills acquired from a variety of settings than can be applied in a different setting. Consider non workplace acquired skills too.

Compared to

Job Related Skills:

Skills that are specific to a particular role or industry.

Adaptive Skills:

More in relation to personality traits that can aid you in your work.

Types Of Transferable Skills

Management / Supervisory / Leadership Skills:

Can you delegate responsibilities and establish an appropriate system of accountability? Are you able to monitor team progress and assess performance?

You may have managed a team at some point in your leisure or work commitments. Perhaps in your workplace you had a team report to you. These transferable management skills can be transferred across industries and different roles. Maybe you manage a sports team, school club, scouts or social clubs. Management skills show that you are capable of leading a team, spotting team members forte’s and enable team efficiency. These management skills inevitably contribute to increased productivity.

Organisational Skills:

Perhaps you sat on the PTA Committee and organised school events. Have you ran a playgroup and organised toddler activities. Maybe you organised workplace socials, meetings or rota’s. What did you do in previous roles that required you to be organised. Being organised is a transferable skill and that is a requirement for pretty much all jobs. Think about how you can provide evidence of good organisational skills.

Numeracy Skills:

If you have worked in commerce you will have varying degrees of handling figures. Did you cash up at the end of the day? Maybe you had to keep a stock log? Did you work in healthcare and have to deal with drug calculations. Perhaps you come from teaching, you may have taught maths at some level but also been involved with performance stats. Have you kept the books for a small business or voluntary organisation. Do you work out the finances for a partner or relative who is self employed?

These numeracy skills can be applied across different roles and industries. Think about how you have used math before and it what way. Use a simple brainstorming sketch.

IT Skills:

Many roles involve a degree of IT skills. Which systems did you use in a previous role? Have you experience of a Customer Relations Management (CRM) package or a Data Collection System? You may be familiar or expert at using productivity software which is invaluable for team efficiency and effectiveness. This may be Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Powerpoint), or Google Apps for Business (G-Suite, Sheets, Documents, Slides, Calendar).

Maybe you have experience setting up presentations in Microsoft Powerpoint or Google Slides. Have you managed spreadsheets in Google Sheets or Microsoft Excel? Maybe you used other productivity software such as Open Office or Zoho?

However limited you feel your IT skills may be, they are relevant as a transferable skill. But, if you haven’t any IT skills or feel that you need a refresher to get up to speed then consider doing a short course to give you the confidence to say you have these skills. We have a collection of courses on site here.

Social Media:

Social Media is a large part of most people’s lives these days. Usually it’s to search the market place, check out local events or keep in touch with friends and family. But maybe you go one step further and you have a group on Facebook or you are a page admin. Is it successful? If so, you have social media skills which are vital to nearly every business. If you enjoy social media but want to learn more then consider courses by Digital Mums or one of our associated courses.

Deadlines:

Have you worked to deadlines? Meeting deadlines with a valuable piece of work shows commitment to the cause, good organisational skills and effective work planning. Again all valuable transferable skills across roles and industries.

Reading / Writing:

It sounds simple but the good use of language, vocabulary, spelling and grammar are fantastic skills to have. All businesses have a form of internal and external communications. Good reading and writing skills are essential for effective communication. If you construct well written sentences, with perfect spelling and grammar then you have excellent written communication skills. If this is a key skill in the role you are applying for, provide evidence.

Maybe you are applying for a role that is not your first language? If this is the case, document what qualifications or experience you have using the language in question.

Mentoring Skills

Whichever role you have previously worked in, you have probably mentored someone junior to yourself. In which case you will have developed mentoring skills. Essential for any kind of management or supervisory role. Can you give feedback in a constructive way? Can you help others build on their knowledge and skills?

These mentoring skills are also associated with the ability to build up trusting relationships, key to productive teamwork.

Interpersonal Skills

Can you interact successfully with a wide range of people? Can you communicate effectively with people from different backgrounds and cultures?

Great interpersonal skills are key to building effective relationships. Think about previous and current roles, both in the workplace and leisure time.

Negotiating Skills

Negotiating is learned from an early age. Even though we can all negotiate to some degree, how good are you at it? What have you had to do in previous roles? Can you listen, contribute, guide and compromise in negotiations. It is important to know where you can compromise and where you need to persist. Again good negotiating skills are built on the ability to build effective relationships.

What Now?

Remember, you are trying to convince a stranger that you are the person they need in their team. You must communicate your confidence and self belief in your CV. After all, why would they want to hire someone who doesn’t have confidence in the skills they are saying they have.

Good Luck and look out for more posts about rocking that CV soon.

Ready to check out those flexible roles? Go to our jobs board now.

Categories
Uncategorized

Newcastle – Your Free Return To Work Day With Sage Is Here

An Opportunity To Return To Work With Confidence And Direction

Join Sage in Newcastle on May 15th for an opportunity not to be missed

You’ve not been out of the loop, you’ve been in training! If you can negotiate with three-year-olds; you’ve been taking special care of clients in a charity shop; if you’ve been serving your country in the forces – we could use your skills. Return to work with Sage.

Where Is It?

Come along on May 15th to our free open day at North Park in Newcastle. You’ll learn more about Sage and more about how valuable your skills are to us and other employers in the North East.

You’ll leave with a new confidence about going back to work, a support network, and loads of fresh ideas. Return to work with confidence, support and direction.

The Sage Foundation

Sage’s philanthropic division Sage Foundation is behind the return to work programme we’re calling Pathways. Sage Foundation VP Debbie Wall explains:

“Pathways is for people who took a break from work, perhaps to raise children or care for others, and now they’re a little overwhelmed at the idea of picking up their careers again. They might be worried that technology has moved on, that jargon has moved on. They might be concerned that the working hours will interfere with their caring obligations. Perhaps they are worrying about being able to juggle the needs of their family with the requirements of an office job.”

“Pathways embraces the new skills they have learned outside the workforce, provides the support they might need to regain confidence, and updates their skill set through training.”

“Sage Foundation believes in helping women, in particular, into secure and rewarding employment, but Pathways is open to men too. We hope it will also appeal to the veteran community, both female and male.”

Family Friendly Return To Work

Return to work with Sage and find roles through this pilot are designed to be flexible and align working hours to family life. They have

  • 12-month training
  • Support built in,
  • Including ongoing mentorship.

Find more information here: www.sage.com/sage-pathways-programme.

Register To Attend

Contact: Just call Kevin Doyle on 07973 849 246 or email [email protected].

About Sage Foundation

Sitting at the heart of Sage Group plc, and led by CEO Steve Hare, Sage Foundation unifies colleagues and partners in a global programme of social change philanthropy, transforming lives to support economic stability and social equality.

All 13,000 colleagues across 23 countries are encouraged to dedicate five paid days a year to charities close to their hearts, through voluntary work and fundraising challenges.

Our colleagues dedicated 24,084 volunteer days to Sage Foundation last year, worth £2.8 million to our beneficiaries. We made 162 philanthropic grants in 2018. In addition to this, CEO Steve Hare has called on global colleagues to achieve $2 million for their charities through fundraising events of their choice.

In particular, we take action to increase opportunities for fulfilment among

  • young people,
  • women,
  • and military veterans

to drive innovation, enhancing access to education, workforce development and exposure to entrepreneurship.

We also proudly facilitate a culture of fast, responsive support for local need. Whether in the aftermath of forest fires in California, drought in South Africa, terror incidents in London, or a sudden shortage of help at a local food bank, we empower our colleagues to work with Sage Foundation to lend a hand.

Our strategic objectives align to six of the 17 United Nations sustainable development goals: education for all; gender equality; decent work opportunities; economic growth; innovation and meaningful partnerships.

You want to return to work, here is your opportunity to do it with an organisation who care.

To see other events on our calendar check these out:

The Find Your Flex Job Fair – London

Shared Parental Leave – Manchester

Categories
Industry Flexers

Focussing On The Candidates – Diversity In The Recruitment Industry

“If companies want gender balance and diversity, they need to embrace different ways of working.”

A guest post from Karen Camilleri, Associate Partner at executive search and interim management consultancy Green Park. Karen specialises in the recruitment of Business Transformation and Change professionals. She is also the proud mum of a little boy of 6. Here she discusses life in recruitment and why flexible working is necessary for a diverse workforce.

How Do You Feel The Recruitment Sector Has Changed Over The Last 20 Years And Why?

Industries have been changing at a furious pace. As organisations fight to stay relevant, we’re seeing greater demand for professionals with experience in leading change and transformation projects.

Leaders with these skills are a commodity and the recruitment sector, which 20 years ago was client-led, is now much more candidate focussed. Organisations are therefore looking for recruitment partners that bring a human touch. One’s that have structured and well supported talent networks that they can tap into. Employee Value Proposition is now a key consideration and element of any talent strategy.

In Your Opinion How Can The Recruitment Industry Best Facilitate Flexible Working?

I think the industry needs to think about deliverables rather than face time in the office. For example, I’m measured against targets which don’t reflect on the number of hours I spend physically at my desk. Instead I work two days from home and I use the office as a base for business meetings.

Companies need a culture where employees are trusted to deliver and manage their time how they see fit. After all, if employers want to address gender balance and diversity, they need to embrace different ways of working. Otherwise they will be fishing in a narrow pool of candidates!

Employers should be proud of their staff and support them as they juggle family needs and work priorities. It’s a proven fact that employees who are able to engage with family or other personal needs are happier and this reflects in their productivity and output.

What Is Green Park’s Diversity Practice And What Are Its Aims?

Today, most business leaders know that diversity and inclusion (D&I) are critical to performance. However, many lack the expertise to achieve their D&I goals. Our D&I Consultancy helps clients approach diversity in a more skilled, mature way. They help them to build their internal capability and knowledge.

Our D&I services include assessments, audits and diagnostics; independently validating diversity strategies, role model development and leadership training; business intelligence and market mapping, talent management and direct hiring strategies.

The Green Park Diversity Team Are The Most Diverse TFL Board In The Organisation’s History. Why Are diversity And Inclusion Initiatives Vital To Creating Successful Talented Teams?

We believe that our clients deserve more choice. That means widening the talent search to look beyond just the usual suspects. Studies have consistently shown that more diverse organisations perform better in many ways. Team collaboration, retention, productivity and market share are all areas where companies that rate highly for D&I, score better than those that don’t.

How Can Candidates Be Assured That Potential Employers Are Committed To Diversity And Inclusion?

Green Park actively campaign for measures to boost diversity, equality and inclusion. But for now, candidates may want to look at a potential employer’s pay gap reporting. It’s also worth exploring whether an organisation puts its money where its mouth is. For example, Intel put $300m into hiring programmes for women and minorities between 2015 and 2020; and spent $1bn with women and minority-owned suppliers.

Thank You For Speaking To Us. Any Words Of Wisdom To Candidates Who Are Embarking On A Career Change Or Returning To Work After A Career Break?

Believe in yourself – if you don’t, hiring managers won’t either!

Look for a work-life balance that works for you. If an organisation won’t accommodate your terms, then use this in your deselection process – don’t work for a company that’s not culturally aligned to your values. Whatever working arrangement you organise, remember the employer is getting great talent out of it, so don’t feel guilty.

Don’t plan too far ahead. Live in the moment. That’s for the returners! As for the career changers, use your network and keep track of the movers and shakers. Connect with coaches and sponsors who have also made those step changes in their career. They can provide you with insight and tips.

Karen Callimeri from Green Park Consultancy