Categories
Careers Flexible Working

The Coolest, Weirdest & Most Christmassy Jobs Ever

2020 has seen mass unemployment, the introduction of the word furlough to our dictionary and the boom in flexible and remote working opportunities.

The year may be almost over, but that hasn’t stopped us thinking about the most amazing jobs that have popped up on the radar over the years during the festive season.

In this article we look at the most amazing jobs that are available during Winter and a lot of them are even available with a flexible working schedule!

Santa Claus

Do you love Christmas? Can you shake your belly like a bowl full of jelly? Can you grow a big beard, name all 9 reindeer AND “Ho Ho Ho”?!

Then your perfect festive job is becoming SANTA!

Santa Claus has been a figure of popular culture since the mid 1700’s and you’ll be responsible for keeping the magic alive. You’ll need to be able to work a crowd of festive fun goers, let out some big Ho Ho Ho’s and captivate children into believing in Santa Claus.

Some background in acting, drama or performing is usually expected as well as being able to improvise and think on the spot – you never know what children might ask Santa for! Preferable attributes include enjoying mince pies, not having a fear of flying and previous reindeer handling experience. This is not essential though as full training will usually be given.

Christmas Elf

Become a part of the yuletide tradition, and turn yourself into a Christmas Elf! If you love Christmas, enjoy working with children, and thrive on helping people create magical memories with a fantastic festive experience then this is absolutely a job you should consider. As an Elf, you will spend early December through to Christmas Eve assisting jolly Santa. 

Experience is desirable but not essential as training will usually be given. A theatrical interest is beneficial, as are any additional special talents to bring a smile to small faces, such as dancing, juggling and general wackiness.

Ice Sculptor

Ice sculptures are created by highly-skilled artists who carve impressions out of ice. Before even a small chunk of ice is removed from a budding ice sculpture, an ice sculptor must first come up with an idea and design. In many cases, this design is dictated by the sculptor’s clients. Once an ice sculptor has decided on what type of masterpiece he wants to create, they must then obtain a suitable piece of ice. The most desirable pieces of ice are rather large and completely clear. Since regular water has a tendency to become cloudy when it freezes, special measures must be taken to create suitable blocks of ice. 

After the idea has been sketched and the ice has been obtained or created, an ice sculptor then starts creating his masterpiece by removing small bits or ice from the block. This can be done using several different tools. Some tools that are used for sculpting ice include chainsaws, chisels, rotary tools, files, rasps, and torches.

Ski Instructor

There are many types of jobs available to people who would like to do temporary seasonal work in a ski resort. One job that is competitive is that of the ski instructor. When dreaming of working in a ski resort, it’s perhaps this role that springs to mind as it is seen as one of the most glamorous positions. You’re out all day on the ski slopes – but isn’t that what people work in ski resorts for; to get as much time as possible on the mountains? 

But working as a ski instructor doesn’t have to be just a temporary seasonal position. A lot of students and graduates who take on holiday or part time work end up making a dedicated full time career out of it. Ski instructors earn between £9-£14 an hour depending on where they’re based.

Professional Gift Wrapper

This is a role with a variety of flexible working options. You could work for yourself, wrapping presents for people with money to spend but are short on time, or you could set up a business where you train others on how to wrap correctly. Wouldn’t it be amazing to go into a shop like Harrods or Selfridges and teach the staff how to present the gift-wrapped purchases beautifully? 

You need creativity and an open mind to become a professional gift wrapper, as well as impeccable attention to detail – every has to be absolutely perfect. People start out on pretty much the minimum wage, but once you’ve got going, you can charge £150 a day. It’s seasonal work though, so you’ll need to think about how to expand your business during the slower times.

Christmas Tree Decorator

If you’ve got an eye for detail, as well as boundless ends of creativity and energy then you could become a professional Christmas tree decorator. You will also need to have steady hands to ensure that ornaments are not damaged, as well as nerves of steel as you may be working up a ladder quite a bit of the time. 

Working schedules are usually quite flexible, however when you do work, you need to know that most decorative work takes place overnight. If you are thoroughly professional and dedicated to ensuring that your work exceeds all client expectations, then this could be the perfect role for you. Chances are you’ll also spend the whole time working with Christmas music playing!

Ice Rink staff

Are you on the hunt for an exciting and different temporary job? Working at a festive ice rink offers plenty of flexibility with schedules and there’s usually loads of overtime up for grabs! Tasks will vary, but ultimately you will be looking after customers on the ice, so you will need to be a strong skater. You will also need to have a great head for health & safety, as the safety of the visitors will be of utmost importance.

The bonus… most seasonal ice-rinks that popup during winter are usually part of some kind of alpine village which includes a bar, food and live entertainment and you will usually get a discount at these places or possibly even some freebies.

Mince Pie Chef

The average pastry chef in the Uk earns between £16k – £29k, with bonuses available of up to £3,000. So if you’ve got a cracking mince pie recipe that the world just simply needs to taste then this might be the job for you. Pastry chefs are responsible for the creation, decoration, and presentation of desserts such as cakes, pastries and pies.

Christmas Card Designer

Are you able to produce contemporary and cutting-edge designs for Christmas? You will need to be full of original ideas and thrive working in a busy studio environment. You’ll need to be passionate and able to keep up to date with the latest trends in colour and product development. Your day to day will consist of creating new designs and reformatting past successes. Sitting and designing Christmas cards all day really does seem like the dream!

Personal Shopper

Are you the kind of person who always manages to buy the exact gift that someone wanted, or went above and beyond what they’d asked for and bought them something even better? If you answered yes then you could be a personal shopper. You may find yourself working for busy families, super-rich celebrities, older people with mobility issues, department stores, corporate executives, image consulting agencies, or event planning companies. The market you work for, will dictate where you shop.You will usually work individually with your clients, who will be short on time and just need someone to take care of everything for them. The role involves you needing to get to know your clients as well as you do your family within a very short space of time. 

If you don’t want to be restrained by a typical 9-to-5 job, then this role is perfect for you! If you’re working for yourself (which is usually the case for many personal shoppers), you’ll decide your own working hours, based on the demand for your services. Starting salaries for personal shoppers are usually around £14,000 to £18,000. With experience, this can increase to between £19,000 and £23,000, while in high-end retail you’ll typically be able to command a salary of about £25,000. If you’re self-employed, you’ll be able to set your own rates, which will largely depend on your location and clientele. Generally speaking, though, you could make an average £250 for a day’s work.

2021 Is On The Way

Christmas this year has felt very different to what we’re used to due to ongoing global pandemic challenges, but 2021 is a brand new year and we’re confident that no matter what happens we’ll all pull together.

Although we don’t currently have any live roles for the job of Santa Claus, we’ve got plenty of other flexible working vacancies on our site.

From everyone at Find Your Flex, we wish you all the best and a very Happy New Year!

Article written by freelance marketer & copywriter Jessica Ross.

Categories
Careers Interviews And CV's

LinkedIn Profile – 5 Ways to Add Visual Impact

When it comes to LinkedIn, much attention is sensibly devoted to finding exactly the right phrases to reflect careers, experience and values. But the old adage that a picture speaks a thousand words still remains true. Follow these 5 pointers to boost your Linkedin presence through visual impact.

Upload A Professional Photo

Profiles with photos are 12 times more likely to clicked on and 36 times more liable to receive a message than those without.

 A studio portrait is best but not strictly necessary. Select a well-lit, high-resolution headshot with good posture. Dress smartly as this is business, not Facebook. Unless relevant to your job, avoid anything that shows you doing a hobby such as cycling etc. Use LinkedIn’s crop and filter functions to get your image spot on – your face should take up at least 50% of the frame. It should be a solo picture. 

Photo of Cheney Hamilton
Photo of Cheney Hamilton

Adopt a positive and engaging expression. No need to grin like a toothpaste ad but a stern countenance radiates less warmth. Ditch fussy backgrounds and heavily patterned clothing. Ensure the photo depicts you accurately. Arriving at an interview looking rather different can be disconcerting for others.

The best size for your Linkedin portrait photo is 400 x 400px.

Modify Your Linkedin Background Image

LinkedIn provides a background, which sits behind the headshot, where you can insert a relevant image. This could be your company logo, a cityscape of where you are based, your ideal workspace, the front cover of a book you have written or a picture of you speaking at an event. 

Linkedin Banner – Rebecca Amin

Due to its size, the background photo is the first thing that a visitor’s eye will land on. Do not settle for the default option – it’s a lost chance to pack a punch and create a unique identity. For example, career coach Rebecca Amin, has chosen “Dare to Begin” that acts as an incentive for visitors to her profile to take action.

The best size for the Linkedin background photo is 1584 x 396px.

Use The Featured Section And Embed Function

Have you written an article or a blogpost or made a video/vlog that you can reference? If so, place these in the featured section at the top of your page or embed in a career entry. 

This is one way in which LinkedIn has more force than a paper copy CV. You can present more about yourself than on two A4 pages, so don’t miss this opportunity.

Site visitors and recruiters are too busy to  look for you in multiple places online. Make life straightforward for them by signalling your media output.

Formatting Your Copy

Linkedin entries can become densely written which makes them energy-sapping to scan. It is also harder to pinpoint key achievements. Whilst a profile benefits from detail, it also needs white space to be reader-friendly. 

  • Bullet points and numbering can provide formatting solutions. 
  • You can also cut and paste colourful icons from online resources. 
  • Ensure the symbols you select are professional.
  • Do not overuse icons to the point that they detract from your message.

LinkedIn does not provide a method of adding words in bold or italics. To do this, type Unicode Text Converter into Google to access a number of sites which allow you to insert phrases which are then transformed into bold and/or italics. Simply cut and paste the newly “converted” words into a LinkedIn entry. 

Grey Matter – Making Visual Connections

You can connect each LinkedIn entry to a LinkedIn page belonging to the company you worked for or the institution you studied at. Do this wherever possible, as a line of bright logos conveys more information and is more visually enticing than a string of dull grey boxes. Sometimes a grey box is inevitable but minimise this. 

Use Linkedin links to institutes or companies

If you cannot find a specific link, consider connecting to pages that are generic. For example, if you took a career break to see more of the world, you could link to a general travelling LinkedIn page. 


Make Your Linkedin Profile Colourful And Interesting – Just Like Yourself.

LinkedIn is your digital reputation, your online calling card. We all react strongly to visuals and live life in colour, so do not overlook these as important aspects to integrate into your profile.

Need some CV Tips?

Try these…

CV Clinic: 10 Tips for choosing the right words.

Online Interview Tips

Categories
Careers Equality and Diversity Flexible Working Lifestyle

Equal Pay Day 2020: Women Should Not Be Working For Free

What Is Equal Pay Day?

Did you know that Equal Pay Day falls on the 20th November this year? 

Equal Pay Day is recognised each year as the day in the year when women effectively, on average, stop earning relative to men. How crazy is that?

The Fawcett Society uses the full-time mean average gender pay gap to work out the day each year, which in 2020 is 11.5%, down from 13.1% in 2019. That means that Equal Pay Day has moved 6 days later in the year, compared to 14th November in 2019. The mean gender pay gap for all employees, not just those working full-time, is 14.6% this year, down from 16.3% last year.

So while most of us spend the rest of the year essentially working for free, we thought we’d take a look at some absolute badass ladies who’ve taken 2020 and smashed it against a wall.

Kamala Harris

(Image credit: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Kamala Harris just wins 2020 in our opinion. She is the first woman – and the first woman of colour – to be elected Vice-President of America. Being the first to do something seems to come naturally to Harris. In 2017, she became the first South Asian-American senator in US history, and the second African-American woman elected to the senate. For countless women and girls, Harris’ achievements represent hope, validation and the shattering of a proverbial glass ceiling that has kept mostly white men perched at the top tiers of American government.

Sundas Khalid

(Image credit: Instagram @sundaskhalidd)

Sundas Khalid is a data science leader and a passionate advocate for diversity in the workplace. She leads search engine analytics at Google and participates in their IamRemarkable initiative, empowering underrepresented communities to celebrate their accomplishments. Outside of work, Sundas volunteers with organizations that promote diversity and inclusion, including Pakistani Women in Computing and North Seattle College, and provides career coaching to help people achieve their dream jobs. 

Lizzie Valedquez

(Image credit: Today.com/Wire Image)

Lizzie is an American motivational speaker, activist, author, and YouTuber. She was born with an extremely rare congenital disease called Marfanoid–progeroid–lipodystrophy syndrome that, among other symptoms, prevents her from accumulating body fat and gaining weight. Her conditions resulted in bullying during her childhood. During her teenage years, she faced cyberbullying, which ultimately inspired her to take up motivational speaking. In addition to being a motivational speaker, Velasquez campaigns for awareness of online bullying, taking part in Kylie Jenner’s #IAmMoreThan project and supporting anti-bullying legislation across the United States.  

Munroe Bergdorf

(Image credit: The Guardian/Luke Nugent)

Model and transgender activist Munroe Bergdorf was featured in the 2020 100 Great Black Britons list and in September was featured on the cover of Teen Vogue. Bergdorf was hired as L’Oréal’s first-ever trans model in 2017 but was axed weeks later when the Daily Mail seized upon comments she had made as white supremacists marched in Charlottesville, Virginia and killed anti-fascism protester Heather Heyer. After L’Oreal sought to align itself with Black Lives Matter, the author and DJ lit into its “meaningless”, hypocritical show of solidarity and called out its “racist snakes”. Bergdorf told Vogue how her outcry prompted a phone call with the brand’s new president Delphine Viguier-Hovasse, who joined after she was fired, and the offer to be L’Oréal Paris’ diversity consultant.

Samira Ahmed

(Image credit: The Telegraph/Jeff Gilbert)

Taking home The Glass Ceiling Award this year. this award-winning journalist took the BBC to tribunal for being paid six times less than a male journalist hosting a similar show – and won the case in a landmark victory that could change the lives and salaries of so many in the future. Her move came after the BBC published the salaries of its highest earners in July 2017 under the terms of its new royal charter, which revealed that only one-third of the list of talent earning more than £150,000 were women, with all the top names being men.

Adwoa Dickson

Image Credit: Dave Benett/Getty Images for Women)

The Woman of The Year 2020 award was presented to the inspirational Adwoa Dickson by Lorraine Kelly, for her work with Amies Freedom Choir. The unique choir aims to develop the musical and cultural awareness of young women who have survived trafficking. It also helps them to explore songs and musical styles from each others’ cultures and languages.

Equal Pay For Everyone

In 2020 things really shouldn’t still be this bad. Equal pay should be a fundamental right and not something that women have to fight for.

Though there are some absolute trailblazers out there paving the way for the rest of us, we need to consider what we can all do to ensure that everyone is treated equally and paid fairly.

Article written by freelance marketer & copywriter Jessica Ross.

Categories
Career Change Careers Interviews And CV's

Career Wheel

Assessing and Handling Your Strengths and Weaknesses

When seeking a new job or trying to progress in a chosen path, there are so many aspects to consider. Many people understandably feel overwhelmed. A multitude of matters demand attention but you may experience trouble in categorising them, prioritising them and tackling them optimally. The career wheel is an effective technique to assist with these concerns.

Fill In The Wheel

Print off a copy of the large wheel shown. Identify the 8 most important features of your job search or career progression. 

For example, you might select any of the following – check online recruitment noticeboards, research employers’ websites, rewrite CV and improve presentation skills. 

You may also opt for increasing confidence, interview tips, sourcing childcare, organising finances, expanding a network of contacts, or even buying appropriate business attire. 

Write these on the edge of the wheel with each feature taking up one segment.

Rate yourself out of 10 on each one. How well are you doing at the moment? Be honest but also be fair to yourself.  

Place a dot on each score in each segment in the 1-10 line. Join these dots together in the manner shown in the small diagram.

What Shape Are You In?

Is your wheel a large, clean circle or does it look more like the uneven, bumpy ride shown in the small diagram? Whatever the outcome, you can immediately see where your strengths and weaknesses lie.

Take A Balanced View

Avoid the mistake of concentrating solely on the “lowness” of some scores, which can lead into a downward spiral of negativity. Instead, look at each ranking, whatever it may be, and give yourself credit for what you have achieved by this stage in your career. Assigning due notice to your positive attributes and your journey so far is vital both in terms of creating a realistic skills audit and in engendering an upbeat perception of yourself.

Ordering Your Needs

The next issue to be determined is the order in which you confront each segment. There are various strategies that you can adopt to help you decide.

  • What is the lowest score? – usually the weakest point attracts immediate attention and you may feel this needs to be managed in a timely manner.

  • Which would be the easiest to implement? – if buying business clothing is a necessity, you may opt for this as it is relatively straightforward to achieve (compared to working on aspects of your character). Do not underestimate the power of quick wins in building confidence.

  • What would have the biggest impact? – if presentation skills are going to make or break your chances, you may wish to enhance these even if you already have a reasonably good score in this respect.

  • What appeals most? – if you have similar scores and nothing stands out, choose what you might enjoy most in developing. This way you can build your motivation.

  • Which is the most cost effective? – resources are finite and improvement may be most helpful when undertaken in an economically conscious manner.

Action Plan

Assessment is of limited value without a plan of action to back it up. For example, assume that you decide to focus on updating your skills. Perhaps, in the past, this was a sticking point when it came to landing the right job. You might come up with the following solutions.

  1. Research what skills prospective employers in a particular market require.
  2. Read a book on how to obtain these skills.
  3. Access free information and pointers on the internet relying on reputable sources.
  4. Take a course.
  5. Join a professional organisation which offers industry accreditation.

Rank how far up the segment scale each option will take you. If one alternative improves you from 2 to 3, but another promotes you from 2 to 4, you have pinpointed what to prioritise. Time and money are scarce commodities, so use them wisely.

Ditch Perfection, Pitch For Progress

Be careful not to be despondent if you do not attain a very high score in every area, even after making significant alterations. The key is to make progress incrementally. As all of us are a work in progress and learning is a lifelong endeavour, aiming for a string of 10s is simply unrealistic. 

If you look at Olympic diving and gymnastics competitions, gold medals are handed out to universal acclaim for scores of less than a perfect 10. Bearing this parallel in mind, do not be too harsh on yourself. A rank of 8 may well be good enough for your purposes. 

What is top-notch, however, is that your own personal career wheel is an ideal tool to highlight talents and opportunities. Use it to roll on to the success you deserve.

Career Wheel, scaled 1 - 10
The Career Wheel
Categories
Careers Disability Flexible Working

Epilepsy And Employment

A Personal Story

Is Epilepsy A Disability?

When is epilepsy considered a disability? Epilepsy comes in many forms. Some more severe than others. According to The Equality Act 2010: “You’re disabled under the Equality Act 2010 if you have a physical or mental impairment that has a ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities.” The Equality Act 2010 aims to ensure all people are treated fairly and not discriminated against. This applies to employment, school and learning, and accessing services. 

We are sharing a personal account from a member of our own team. Barbara’s working life began before The Equality Act was passed. Barbara suffers from epilepsy and wanted to share her story about how it has affected her working life.

Barbara’s Story

Diversity and Inclusion. These two words mean a lot to me and I wish that 47 years ago it had meant something to employers. Sadly in my experience it meant nothing. I suffer from Epilepsy, an invisible disability yet it certainly becomes incredibly visible when you have a seizure.

I was diagnosed with epilepsy (petit mal with grand mal fits) at the age of 17. Albeit I’d been having fits since I was 11. This coincided with the removal of my appendix. Things were very different back in the 60’s. So there I am, a 17 year old wanting to be one of the crowd. However I didn’t feel I could be. I wanted a Saturday job, to drive a car, to go out with my friends without my (fabulous) parents keeping a beady eye on me constantly. These things, which may seem normal to a lot of people, were out of reach for me.

Telling The Truth About My Epilepsy To Potential Employers

The job was the most important issue. The need to earn my own money was strong. I wanted my independence to buy those Levis or the new Cat Stevens album. I walked around my hometown going into every shop and everyone asked, was I healthy? Being honest, I felt I had no option but to tell the truth. When I told potential employers I suffered from epilepsy, the response was a resounding no. They couldn’t risk me having a fit (as they were known then) in front of people. I felt so deflated. I felt like the odd one out and I was.

Lying About My Epilepsy Got Me A Job

Not to be deterred I changed tactics. When looking for a role, I lied. I said I had no health issues. What a difference, 4 offers of jobs. I was so excited. And so I started working on a Saturday at a well known shoe shop and then the worst happened. I had a seizure whilst working. Subsequently I was hauled off to hospital (and had no memory of it) to be popped in a corner as there was nothing they could do. My parents collected me. They then had to break the news to me that I had been sacked from my role. I was sacked for not being honest and also as their customers did not want to see a member of staff having a seizure.

From a confident and outgoing teenager, I became angry and hurt. I had no understanding why my disability should prevent me from working. I wanted to be a children’s nurse. Sadly however due to my epilepsy I was not allowed. Nothing else at the time was good enough. It was really hard.

Finally An Employer Who Understood

It took me until I was 21 to find a permanent job with a company who had faith in me, despite my epilepsy. The company was ‘Clinique’ part of the Estee Lauder Group. I remember like it was yesterday them saying it was about me, not my epilepsy. Luckily I generally knew when I was going to have a seizure. I would just tell my manager, no more ambulances and hospitals.

I did not stay there forever but they gave me my confidence back. A determination to fight the discrimination against disabilities. Most of all, be proud of who I was, epilepsy and all.

Sadly as a country we had to wait until 2010 for the Equality Act. I was 54, already having battled most of my working life through discrimination. Life wasn’t all bad though, I have three fantastic children despite being told not to have any.

A Message About Inclusion To Employers

My message to employers is this. Remember, there are so many invisible disabilities and people have a right to be included in the workplace without judgement. These are strong and talented people who want a chance to have a successful career, a job they love and to be part of the team. They don’t want sympathy, they want understanding. 

Hence why flexible working is the way forward, it is the future of work. If an employee needs a different way or place to work, this should be discussed without judgement or prejudice. By embracing inclusion every employer has a lot to gain. Every disabled person has something to offer, they don’t let their disability get in their way. So don’t let employment discrimination stop them either.

Be kind, you never know what people are going through.

Barbara

Thank you Barbara for sharing your story. I’m sure many can relate when it comes to being honest about health issues with potential employers.

Diversity and Inclusion are two key components of our values here at The Find Your Flex Group. We firmly believe that flexible working and an inclusive work culture not only encourages but drives diversity. The benefits of diversity are numerous. For example higher retention rates, a bigger talent pool to recruit from, increased innovation not to mention the benefits for the individuals.

For further advice about living with epilepsy and employment:

Epilepsy.org – Employment campaign

EpilepsySociety.org.uk – Work, employment and epilepsy

Categories
Career Change Careers Interviews And CV's

CV Clinic: 10 Tips for Choosing the Right Words

Your Guide To CV Writing

CVs can come in waves, clogging up in-boxes. Busy professionals, with a burgeoning schedule of other things to do, have just enough time to skim through them. You have a window of opportunity, perhaps seconds, to present yourself to full advantage and catch an employer’s eye. Your word selection can either tank your application without a trace or fast forward you to the interview stage.

Follow These 10 Tips To Get Your CV Noticed For All The Best Reasons. 

  • What not to write – do not put “curriculum vitae” at the top of your CV, as it should be obvious what the document is. Instead write your name as the header which is the first thing the reader should alight upon. Avoid irrelevant information such as your marital status and date of birth. There are legal protections against discrimination, so an employer is not required to be privy to certain types of personal data.
  • Me, myself and I – there is no need to keep repeating “I”, as it can be cumbersome. It is, after all your CV and the sense should be clear from the context. Fast forward to your accomplishments by skipping over redundant words.

x I created a new distribution system

Created a new distribution system

  • Say it, spell it – some words sound the same but are spelt differently. As this is not always picked up by computers, be vigilant and proofread your CV carefully. Even minor slip-ups can suggest a lack of attention to detail and damage credibility. 

x Principle lead for there projects

Principal lead for their projects

When your CV is up to scratch, print it out. It is easier to pick up on spelling and grammatical errors in hard copy than on a screen.

  • Cut out superfluous words – as Thomas Jefferson said, “the most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words where one will do.” Avoid verbose phrases and stick to simplicity.

x Undertook the implementation of

Implemented 

x Achieved the completion of

Completed 

  • Generic v specific – ditch sentences that could be applicable to anybody in any situation. These have limited appeal. Instead cite examples which differentiate you from your competitors and which showcase transferable talents relevant to a prospective employer. It is important also not merely to state your general duties but what you impact you had.

x Enthusiastic about knowledge transfer

Established monthly training sessions to give updates on market developments 

x Responsible for personnel development

Mentored junior colleagues to achieve industry accreditations

  • Jargon busting – unless writing for someone who understands sector-specific language, beware of abbreviations and acronyms. They are confusing and few have the patience to work out what a jumble of letters might signify. Your task is to provide a smooth read, not a guessing game.

x Member of ACEVO

Member of the Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations 

  • Active verbs – highlight what you actually did by using engaging verbs which suggest a dynamic rather than a passive or marginal contribution. 

x Attended a product launch

Demonstrated a product at its launch and handled all customer queries 

x Helped with the marketing strategy

Created a digital marketing platform

  • Add it up – some buzzwords are so over-used as to be meaningless and can become wearisome to read. But figures turn your expertise into concrete, memorable facts rather than vague, forgettable assertions. Quantify your success.

x Passionate about achieving cost savings

Achieved cost savings of 25%

x Gained experience in people management

10 years managing a team of 12 employees

  • Easy reading – avoid the temptation to cram more into your CV (the standard format is two A4 pages) by reducing the size and type of font. If a recruiter is left squinting, it’s game over. Opt for Arial or Times New Roman in font size 12. 

Your CV also benefits from white space, headings and bullet point lists in order to be user-friendly. The solution is in changing your words, not your layout. Consider different phrase formulations until you hit the most succinct one. A thesaurus is a helpful tool in this regard as it can suggest a range of suitable words.    

  • Made to measure – whilst you may have an all-purpose CV, attract more interest by tailoring it for each employer. What exactly does the job ad specify and how can you respond convincingly with words that resonate in this particular situation? Bespoke clothes feel special. So do bespoke CVs.

A smart move is to read your CV aloud, either to yourself or to a trusted person who can give practical feedback. Is your text punchy? Are you precise enough about your results? How do you come across? Edit and edit again. With the appropriate word choice, you can do justice to yourself and your talents – and be several steps closer to the job that you want.

With thanks to Rob Ashton of Emphasis Training, a consultancy specialising in business writing and communication –  www.writing-skills.com

Looking for more CV writing tips… How To Approach CV writing After A Career Break.

Categories
Careers Interviews And CV's

Online Interviews

How To Zoom To Success

Online interviews are on the rise, offering employers the opportunity to engage with a wider range of candidates in a more efficient manner. Digital possibilities bring the economic and strategic benefits of reducing the time, resources and cost involved in selecting the perfect hire. But how ready are you for this form of recruitment?

“There are two aspects to online interviews – situation preparation and personal presentation. You need to nail both to maximise your chances of getting the job you want,” advises Samina Kiyani, an experienced broadcast journalist, awards host and media trainer. “The golden rule is this – minimise distractions.”

10 Tips For Zooming To Success.

By Samina Kiyani

  • Location, location, location – usually the employer decides upon the setting. But, with online interviews the onus is on you. Choose a spot which is neat, tidy and neutral. Steer clear of intimate spaces such bedrooms, as this is too personal for a business meeting.
  • Unintended soundtracks – consider what is within earshot. For example, you really do not want the sound of a distant washing machine to feature as the theme music to your interview. If the home phone rings, can you hear it? As you switch off your mobile, consider also temporarily disconnecting your landline.
  • Let there be light – ensure that the light falls on your face. It is best to sit facing a window, about a metre away from it. Avoid having your back directly to the window, as sunshine from behind can form a halo effect. Have a lamp that you can switch on, if your potential employer says it is too dim to see you properly. The amount of luminescence in the room is not always the same as that transmitted via the screen.
  • Connectivity and technology – check your internet works and the wifi speed is good exactly in the place where you site your computer. Some have been caught out by poor connection in certain areas. Verify the audio, video and mute functions. Just as you would arrive 10 minutes early for an office interview, log on before the scheduled start to deal with any last-minute mishaps.
  • Max headroom – too much headroom means that the interviewer mostly sees your background. You are pitching yourself, not your choice of wallpaper. Your head should appear 1/4 down from the top of the screen to maintain the right proportions.
  • Right height – placing the computer too low can distend your neck, and over-emphasise your chin and nose. Position the screen at eye height, balancing on sturdy books if required, to give prominence to your facial expressions.
  • Dress well – avoid anything with a small design as the print can seem to waver, slightly but noticeably, on the screen. Whilst white clothing may sparkle in a traditional situation, on a screen ensure it does not reflect so much light that it leaves your face dull by comparison. Stick to simple, structured clothing and dress professionally from top to toe. Accidentally revealing pyjamas or jeans under more formal upper attire is a clumsy approach. 
  • Body language – given that things become magnified on screen, even minor tics can distract. Fidgeting can give off an unhelpful vibe of shiftiness. Refrain from over-gesticulating to the point that your arms move out of screen, as this is disruptive and gives the impression of flailing. Beware also of making strong forward gestures with your hands, as this can come across as jabbing. You don’t have to freeze like an Easter Island statue but be mindful of your movements.
  • Roving eye – you may have reduced disturbances at your end but this may not be true of your prospective employer. They may perhaps be in a setting that inadvertently shows people walking past or undertaking office activities in the background. During an online interview keep your focus on the interviewers. A loss of eye contact can break rapport.
  • Trial run – it can be uncomfortable to see home videos of ourselves. A mock interview is essential to highlight what aspects require attention. Preferably do this online with a knowledgeable person who can make an objective assessment and give you honest, constructive feedback. Are you making one of the errors listed here or are you inadvertently speaking at an unexpected pitch or speed? If nothing else, at least record yourself and replay to figure out what to improve on. 

“Ideally an online interview should feel as natural as a face-to-face one,” says Samina. “It’s definitely a skill that candidates need in their repertoire. But don’t get too fixated by the fact that there is a screen in front of you. With practice, you can pull it off.”

Samina Kiyani provides communication and online interview training at www.saminakiyani.com 

For more advice on interviews and CV’s you may want to read these 5 ‘Top Tips For Nailing That interview‘ and ‘How To Approach Writing A CV After A Career Break’

Categories
Career Change Careers

The Secret To A Successful Career Change

Guest Author – Leila Singh

Accredited Master Coach, Personal Brand Consultant, Corporate Trainer, TEDx Speaker, Award-Winning Author and Founder of The Authentic Leadership Academy™ and mi-brand™

Anything is possible!

If you had been with me during the summer of the year 2000, you would have seen me sitting at my desk in a large open-plan office, writing out a pros and cons list of what I wanted to do. Don’t get me wrong, I was happy in my job, had a great manager and a good salary. And I had studied hard to gain my professional qualifications. Yet, I felt that I wanted more. Something was missing. Having carried out my due diligence, a couple of months later, you would find me sitting in a large meeting room, the goldfish bowl as we called it, because everyone could see in through the expanse of glass. Opposite me sat my manager, Peter.

“Recruitment??? But you have spent years working towards your accountancy career, and you are good at what you do, why would you throw that all away? Is it the money?”

“Not at all, in fact I am taking a 50% pay cut to do this…and I know it will work out…after all, what is the worst that can happen?”

A year or so later, sitting across from my Sales Director Steve, for my annual review, “Leila we took a risk on you, you had no relevant experience, and yet you have been our highest biller this year!”

Prior to this, I was the quiet diligent church mouse, who kept my head down and worked really hard; it was a manager during that time who had shared his advice “Leila, if you want to achieve your career aspirations, you need to make yourself known, so people that matter know who you are and what you do, and recognise your talents…”

I spent two years in recruitment – that time afforded me exponential personal and professional growth. It highlighted that 1) taking a risk and 2) taking myself so far outside my comfort zone, enabled me to realise what is possible, as well as my potential, strengths, and to cultivate the confidence and self-belief I had never had.

Following redundancy, I was offered an opportunity in a global technology firm; I jumped at it, as the company had a great reputation. The role? Nothing I had ever done before. Corporate Finance; designing and implementing change, negotiating multi-$M contracts with investment banks and lenders, as well as establishing and managing a significant financing portfolio across the EMEA region. My confidence, desire to win, willingness to take risks, ask questions and learn fast, held me in good stead. I built a strong network across the business and was influential in achieving results.

After six years, we were acquired by Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), where I was offered two opportunities; A Sales Executive or a Treasury Consultant role. I opted for the latter, as this complemented the previous role and enhanced my skills further. After 15 months, I transitioned to the Sales Executive role. During my tenure in this role of almost 10 years, I delivered a little shy of $1bn of business.

The Secret To Successful Career Changes.

You may be asking, what is my secret to successfully transitioning through different careers?

It comprises the following.

  • Believing that I can achieve anything I put my mind to (someone once told me this, and it is so true).
  • Going over and above in my delivery and performance at all levels, be that internal or external clients,
  • Being resilient to the challenges I encountered and never giving up.
  • Not being afraid to ask questions, whilst being a quick learner.
  • Building strong professional relationships, whilst showing up authentically and showing a genuine interest in others.
  • My desire to stand out and make a difference, and be a role model for others.
  • Maintaining high standards consistently in all that I do

And today?

I am the Founder and CEO of my own business, where I coach, mentor and train ambitious career professionals to accelerate their career, through establishing their personal brand, resulting in greater visibility, impact, and performance.

Six years earlier, whilst still a sales executive, working no less than 60 hours a week, I began to immerse myself even further into my personal growth journey; I trained and qualified as a Master Practitioner of Neuro Linguistic Programming and Hypnotherapy. I went on to join a Professional Speakers Academy to refine my speaking and presentation skills; an academy for which I now mentor others. I became an Accredited Master Coach as well as an L&D Trainer at Hewlett Packard Enterprise (yes, this was also alongside my job). I wrote and published my book, Success Redefined – How to Leverage Your Natural Talents to be Limitless” in 2015. I also did a board break with my hand, walked on hot coals and on broken glass. I attended various events and training sessions with Anthony Robbins. I invested heavily in myself – money, time, and energy, surrounding myself with the best coaches and mentors, to continue to learn and grow and to be able to show up for my clients as the best version of myself.

I chose to leave HPE at the end of 2018 and embark on this next chapter of my life. Yes it has been challenging, leaving behind my corporate identity, the structure, the salary and the corporate benefits of a large organisation, to live in a world of uncertainty, and yet it is a life of freedom, choice, risks, celebrations and massive personal growth.

Embracing A Growth Mindset.

Growth never stops; this is one of my core values, alongside [personal] leadership and authenticity. And I am proud to say that my biggest accomplishment to date is becoming a TEDx Speaker in 2019.

If you are thinking, “I want change, but…” consider this;

1. When I went through my first career transition, from accountant to recruitment consultant, having just given notice, within a matter of days, my mother was diagnosed with cancer and as a consequence, overnight had become paralysed from the waist down. What should I do? I could have very easily chosen to stay in the finance role, something that I knew and was settled in. Yet I went ahead with the transition, whilst for the first several months, supporting my mother in adapting to her newfound restricted and tragic situation, dealing with the emotions of the situation, and being her primary carer alongside my father.

2. On the same day my mother was diagnosed, I was due to move out of home, having purchased my first place, having simultaneously agreed to taking a 50% pay cut…I believed it would work itself out – and it did.

3. I spent sixteen years of my career in the technology sector, as a woman of colour, in a male dominated environment. I did not experience imposter syndrome, nor feel that I was treated differently from my colleagues.

Why? Because my focus was on me, my desire to stand out for the right reasons, over-performing, and consistently maintaining high professional standards.

What would I say are the key ingredients needed for a successful career transition?

ABC: Attitude, Belief and Commitment (I might add: Consistency, Diligence and EQ 

Leila Singh

Leila Singh FCCA is an Accredited Master Coach, Personal Brand Consultant, Corporate Trainer, TEDx Speaker, Award-Winning Author and Founder of The Authentic Leadership Academy™ and mi-brand™

You can learn more about Leila at www.leilasingh.com and connect with her on Linkedin.

Thank you to Leila for providing us with an in depth view of her career decisions and changes. Very inspirational.

If you liked this post then you may also like this post from guest author Didier Penine – ‘Going Self Employed’.

Look out for future blogs and tips for navigating a career change.

Categories
Career Change Careers

Going Self Employed

By Didier Penine

Which Career?

For as long as I can remember I have never had a clear idea of the career I wanted, and this was reflected in my university degree as I chose the subject I was best at which was French due to my background. During my degree I realised I needed something to go with my degree so I did a postgraduate in business management to give me further options.

I found a graduate program with an electrical wholesaler, I was there for a good 10 years and earned a few promotions until I was in a head office role negotiating rebates and sales worth large sums and on paper it looked a good position. Throughout my time there I had a niggly feeling that it wasn’t right for me, and I put it down to not pursuing a career that related to my interests.

A Change Of Career

Through redeveloping my own home I gained a strong interest in buildings, and I decided that changing careers had to be done to pursue a career in construction. Having done a great deal of research I decided that Quantity Surveying would be the idea role and duly did my distance learning and gained a first class degree from the College of Estate Management.

Within a month of being there, that feeling of dissatisfaction was there again, and it quickly grew to a level greater than I had ever experienced. The people around me were incredibly helpful and supportive and really nice people, however my dissatisfaction was mounting on a daily basis and I could so no escape. This caused great mental anguish as I had spent a considerable amount of time and money to be in the position that I wanted, yet I felt trapped and was unhappier than I had ever felt before. The realisation then dawned on that I needed to be self-employed.

My first roles after graduated offered a certain amount of freedom as they were largely sales/managerial type roles. Quantity surveying was quite the opposite, I found it very restrictive, very constrained and every part of the role was bound by procedure and regulations which stifled my natural desire to do my own thing.

Going Self Employed

For a good 12 years or so I had kept toying with the idea of being self-employed, I had considered being a property developer, however I was apprehensive about the cash required to set up the businesses, plus my property skills weren’t quite there. My other thought was to set up a personalised Champagne business – clearly this quite niche but there is some logic to my desire, My family produce Champagne in Festigny, France and when I got married my dad brought over about 30 bottles of wedding themed Champagne themed around our big day, and as soon as I saw them it was kind of a lightbulb moment, I was instantly drawn to setting up a personalised Champagne business.

As much as I wanted to set up the business, I was apprehensive about quitting a guaranteed salary for doing so. I considered the Champagne business when applying for the construction distance learning but opted for the Quantity Surveying being the safer option. It was when I felt despondent in my quantity surveying career that I realised I had to go for it, and piece by piece I began putting it all together.

This was quite daunting of course as I had no contacts or even any experience in the industry in the UK. Apart from having a family that produces Champagne I was going into it totally cold, however I felt certain there was merit in the idea and that is how Say It With Champers was born. The business is now a year old and we cater for both businesses and the general public, and in terms of job satisfaction I have never been happier than I am currently. Being a startup I earn far less than I did before, luckily the loss-making months are behind me and I can focus on growing and developing the business.

A Career Change Can Be Full Of Hurdles

With hindsight I probably didn’t appreciate how long it takes to build a new business up, the hours I have worked have been much more than previous roles, and in the early days I would be doing crazy hours months only to earn a loss, which of course made me question my decision. I kept at it and a few strokes of luck came my way, now I have confidence that the business will succeed, but of course it was a risk. The definition of whether it has been a success or not would depend on the point of view. In purely financial terms then it hasn’t as the amount earned this year will be much less than previous years. For the future however I believe there is great potential, everyone in the country has birthdays, many people celebrate mother’s/father’s day, anniversaries, weddings and so on. We are also providing mini Prosecco which is perfect as wedding favours and so on.

For the corporate side I have made some great customers with football clubs and gold clubs, and of course it takes time to build things up. You carry on doing the things that work, and stop doing the things that don’t, learning by trial and error is part of the process unfortunately. I feel very optimistic about the future and I have never been happier, so to my the change has been a success, I think with any business you need to give it time and not expect it to be an overnight success.

“Changing careers is a very daunting thing to do…”

Changing careers is a very daunting thing to do, for me I really hated going to work, and when I made the decision I was 35 with another 30 years work ahead of me. I just couldn’t face the prospect of wishing away every day and hoping for the weekend for the remainder of my working career. With any of these decisions you need to be able to have the financial means to pay for the degree, potential loss of earnings (as you may be starting at the bottom of the ladder again). For those who are looking to start a business, this of course has even greater risk, in reality you have to almost write off a year without a salary, and if you can afford that plus the cost of setting the business up, then it may well be an option worth taking.

Didier penine from say it with champers

It all comes down to personality and the choices you have made in your teenage years. Your A level choices will influence your degree choice, which in turn necessarily influence your choice of career. People will often find themselves stumbling into a career that may not necessarily suit them, and of course every year that goes past, the harder it feels to take the plunge and change careers. Many people I knew were dissatisfied with the jobs and careers, and in my experience this became more pronounced when people hit their 30’s.

A change can be a good thing, a lot depends on your individual circumstance such as personality, finances and so on. Granted not every career change will be a success as I experienced myself, however it can be very rewarding for some. 

In my opinion if you are thinking about changing careers to another industry, then go for it – the risk is relatively low and as long as you leave on good terms you will likely be able to go back to your old organisation or industry if it wasn’t. Changing careers to start a business needs more thought, a clear plan and a solid financial footing are imperative if this is being considered.

Thank you to Didier for providing us with a detailed journey through his career decisions.

If you are considering a career change then you may be find this blog interesting too: ‘The Secret To A Successful Career Change’ .

Also look out for future posts on tips and resources to help you navigate a career change or pivot.

Categories
Careers Industry Flexers

Jobs At Supermarkets And Measures Taken During The Covid-19 Pandemic

Supermarket Information

The supermarkets are recruiting. Mainly temporary roles but some permanent too. During this time of massive change and restrictions we rely heavily upon the food industry to ensure we have a steady supply of food. As people need to self isolate (including supermarket employees) the supermarkets are trying to ensure they have the people needed to manufacture, distribute and sell the food.

Below you will find some information on where to find the jobs, store opening hours, latest brand news and the special hours for NHS workers and the vulnerable.

Please remember that as this situation is rapidly evolving, some of the following news, guidance and roles may have changed. For advice on self isolation, social distancing and the latest NHS and government advice and restrictions please always check official sources:

NHS: Click Here

Gov: Click Here

ASDA

OPENING HOURS: Reduced opening hours, check your local store here

NHS workers 8am – 9am Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays

Elderley & Vulnerable: No stated hours but where possible people in this category must self isolate.

 

ASDA JOBS: click here.

NEWS: News from Asda and what they are doing to support and help communities and colleagues, click here.

 

MORRISONS

OPENING HOURS: Store opening times: Monday – Saturday 8am – 8pm. Store finder here.

NHS Workers can shop 7am – 8am, Monday – Saturday

Elderley & Vulnerable: No stated hours but where possible people in this category must self isolate.

 

MORRISONS JOBS:

Cheshire: Gadbrook Produce Manufacturing site

UK, Temporary Home Delivery Opportunities

UK, Logistics, Food & Catering

NEWS: News from Morrisons.

 

Tesco

OPENING HOURS: Store opening times

NHS workers Can browse and fill their basket up to one hour before opening on a Sunday.

Elderly and Vulnerable: Tesco will prioritise one hour every Monday, Wednesday and Friday morning between 9-10am (except in our Express stores), but where possible people in this category must self isolate.

 

TESCO JOBS: Tesco careers

NEWS: Tesco expects further recruitment to take place in the coming weeks. Read about Tesco’s efforts here.

 

Sainsburys

OPENING HOURS: Store opening times, Monday – Saturday 8am -8pm, Sunday as usual.

Store Locator.

NHS workers have a dedicated hour Monday, Wednesday and Friday 8am – 9am

Elderley & vulnerable: Monday, Wednesday and Friday 8am – 9am. However people in this category should be self isolating.

 

SAINSBURY’S JOBS: Find Sainsbury’s jobs here.

NEWS: Read more about what Sainsbury’s are doing here. Sainsbury’s News

 

Marks & Spencer

OPENING HOURS: Store opening hours here

NHS workers have first hour of trading on Tuesdays and Fridays

Elderley & vulnerable: First hour of trading on Mondays and Thursdays. However people in this category should be self isolating.

 

M&S JOBS: Find Jobs Here.

NEWS: Information from M&S.

 

THE NHS ARE SEEKING VOLUNTEERS TO HELP OVERCOME THIS CRISIS

IF YOU CAN HELP REGISTER HERE

 

As always we have lots of roles waiting for applications on our flexible working jobs board. Jump over to our search page here….


Flexible Job Search Click Here