Categories
Flexible Working Lifestyle

The Four Day Working Week

The four day week has been touted as the “new better” for the way we work and is gaining widespread traction as a consequence of the game-changing coronavirus pandemic. A FindYourFlex survey found that 72% of respondents would welcome a four day week to turbocharge the economy with 28% against. But what does this actually entail? 

What Does A 4 Day Week Mean?

There are various forms of four day week. So, the FndYourFlex Survey further asked what kind of 4 day week people preferred.

  • Compressed schedule – complete five days of work in four, with no loss of salary. 78% favoured this approach.
  • Part-time model – work for four days and receive less pay. 18% of respondents gave this the thumbs up (4% were uncommitted to either compressed or part-time).
  • 32 hour week – more radical is the proposal made by John McDonnell of the Labour Party that the full-time working week should be lowered to 32 hours but without any loss of pay. 

A universal Monday to Thursday is unrealistic as we want to visit shops, museums, sporting venues and restaurants every day of the week, and care homes and emergency services operate round-the-clock. But the idea is that people can work differently outside the traditional norm.

Why Adopt A Shorter Week?

A truncated week is cited as offering a number of advantages as it may:

  • replenish physical resources – rest and/or leisure activities revitalise us;
  • boost mental well-being – stress and anxiety fall;
  • enhance relationships – more fulfilling time is spent with family and friends;
  • save the environment – less commuting erases part of our carbon footprint;
  • jump start volunteering – charities may see an upsurge in participation;
  • stabilise employment – redundancies are avoided by having all staff on reduced hours; 
  • widen the talent pool – those shut out by rigid timings can enter the job market;
  • capture loyalty – a talent retention mechanism to stop good workers from leaving; and 
  • cut overheads – if the office is shut for an extra day, running costs decrease. 

How Controversial Is A Shorter Week?

Objections are raised against four day patterns of whatever ilk. Flex requests have been refused for myriad reasons such as impractical personnel changes, higher costs, downgraded business performance, lower customer service, and/or the need for continuity over five days. 

But it is the 32 hour week, do-four-get-five, that is stirring particular controversy. Surely it is counter-intuitive to pay someone more for working fewer hours? Yet many of us are already paid to go on holiday through remunerated annual leave. The state offers statutory parental entitlements, sometimes topped up generously by employers, essentially paying people to look after their own children for a while. This is done because there are acknowledged social and health benefits that outweigh the pure economic expense. The ask of the 32 hour week is to push this concept one step further. 

32 Hour Week – How Much Does It Cost?

The battleground of the 32 hour week is the possible price tag associated with it. The NHS is often mentioned as a problematic situation. If you pay a nurse for five days instead of four, you must hire more staff since people are ill every day. The Conservative Party claims that the costs to the NHS would swell by £6.1 billion a year. Others assert that the NHS is a special case and not the yardstick by which to judge all sectors. 

Autonomy, a non-profit organisation, has stated that the cost of the 32 hour week is lower, as bald headline figures fail to factor in the gains from beneficial features such as reduced medical absence. As the Health and Safety Executive has estimated 57% of sick days are due to work-related stress, anxiety and depression, this is not to be ignored lightly. The difficulty is that several of the advantages, outlined earlier in this article, are not easy to quantify and are contentiously debated by those who champion one assessment methodology over another. 

What Next?

The part-time and compressed four day weeks, whilst not as widespread as they could be, are progressively being offered. However, even the most ardent proponents of the 32 hours option admit that adjustments will be incremental rather than an overnight phenomenon. There are likely to be a plethora of trial runs, setbacks and resistance. It may also not be viable in every instance. 

But it is worth remembering that changes that were initially seen as radical are accepted as standard practice. The 5 day week was once novel, annual leave was viewed as rewarding indolence, and maternity leave was regarded as an unnecessary self-indulgence. Now we expect these benefits. There is the potential to herald in a whole new future.

Categories
Flexible Working Lifestyle

Why Flex About It?

When someone commented on my “tidy and uncomplicated career”, as apparently demonstrated by my LinkedIn profile, I was astonished. Whilst I was glad that my LinkedIn entries were giving a favourable impression, my life behind them was at various junctures full of twists and turns, some beneficial and others more challenging. That simple, casual aside caused me to ponder upon the role of flexibility in my own situation and the implications of flex for the workplace and society more widely.

How And Why Of Flex

“The trouble with this flexibility lark,” I was once advised, “is that it’s all about part-time for mothers.” Leaving the matter of whether flex employees merely “lark” around (we don’t), such a narrow view overlooks the myriad respects in which work and personal life can meld together. People want a variety of adaptable arrangements, regardless of their gender or parental status. 

Although I switched to part-time after the birth of my son, before that I was full-time in varying formats – remotely from home, compressed hours and staggered start/finish. The motives for doing so ranged from fracturing my foot, caring for my father who was temporarily very unwell, undertaking voluntary activities that accorded with my values, and studying for a postgraduate qualification. There were also two instances when I took sabbaticals to be an expat spouse, accompanying my husband when he was posted abroad. 

On each occasion that a dilemma arose, I worried that I would either have to discard the job I enjoyed or compromise on other equally important concerns. After all, we are more than our CVs. Fortunately, things were made easier by having a far-sighted employer who played the long game, coupled with a line manager who was a results-watcher rather than a time-and-motion monitor. When I asked my employer why there was such understanding and accommodation across the spectrum, not only for me but the majority of my colleagues, the HR specialist responded, “we get it back in spades.”

Flex For Life

Flexible working should not be confined to the trials and travails of one person – it affects all of us. With the pension age ever increasing, we are facing a career span of 50 years. With these demographics, is it really feasible to expect people to soldier on unremittingly with set-in-stone hours for half a century? This might be acceptable if life were akin to a pleasant amble on a beach but we know that, instead, events can crash upon us in huge waves and grab us in the undertow.  

As a former Chair of a legal diversity organization, I saw the attrition rate of highly trained people who walked out for the sole reason that it was impossible to find a work pattern that suited their changing circumstances. It is a dismaying waste of talent. Sadly, in many cases, even relatively minor adjustments would have swung the pendulum in a more positive direction. 

Through being a trustee of diversity and inclusion charities, I know that flexibility is required for all groups and at every stage of a person’s life. For example, grandparents need it to help care for grandchildren as much as a young person requires it for disability issues. And it is vital to remember that flex is not only an answer to difficult situations, such as dealing with illness, but is also a liberating response to optimistic aspirations, such as having more space for oneself or one’s interests.

Ripple Impact Of Flex

Should we really care whether Jill can log on from home once a week or whether Jack leaves early on Tuesdays and Thursdays? Actually, these seemingly innocuous changes have a startling domino effect. Such tweaks result in workers being motivated to continue in jobs that best utilise their talents, instead of seeking a new employer with the upheaval that brings. Oxford Economics, for example, has calculated that replacing a staff member can be as much as £30,000, taking into account factors such agency fees, advertising, interviewing, management time etc., with a major expense being the impact of disruption.

If Jill works remotely, this minimises commuting with the attendant extra cost, exhaustion and environmental pollution. Both Jack and Jill remain in gainful employment, paying the taxes that we need for schools and the NHS, and building up pensions for their long-term security. Through flex they gain a better work/life ratio and maintain their well-being, thus cutting down on sick days and medical visits. When flexibility keeps people in jobs, in health and in balance, the ripple effect means that we all win.      

Flex Update

Reflecting on this, I rewrote my LinkedIn profile so as not to photo-shop out the significance of flex to me. Without it, I could not have engaged constructively with various aspects of my life cycle – family, health, education, volunteering, living abroad. Even worse, I might have abandoned the workplace altogether and become just another disillusioned statistic fallen by the professional wayside. This is why I advocate for others to have the advantages that I had and continue to enjoy.

Now is the time to flex and flex for all.  

 

Susha Chandrasekhar

Susha Chandrasekhar
Categories
Flexible Working

Home Working And How Do It

10 Ways To Work From Home During The Coronavirus Pandemic

Coronavirus is making the country take drastic measures. The aim is to preserve the safety of the vulnerable and attempt to prevent our NHS from being overwhelmed. Guess what? Home working has been fully advised where possible. 

Our team has been home working since our beginnings back in 2017, so we thought we’d share a few tips to help you on your way through this challenging time, but even for us we face the challenge of possibly having to juggle work and entertaining / teaching our kids at home too.

So here goes…

  • Plan – Spend some time just planning your work. It may feel like precious time wasted but it is totally worth it. By planning you can prioritise your work and aim to keep to a schedule. Personally I find the best time to do this is on a Friday afternoon (in an attempt to keep weekends free for family time). Make use of tools like Trello and Asana or if you prefer just use a good old diary! 
  • If you are going to be home working with your partner and have kids at home then work in shifts. We may have to accept that one takes an early shift working with an early start and then the other takes a late shift to work with a later finish, swapping over the childcare.
  • Where possible try to find your home working space. Your office, the dining table, a summer house, the bedroom just somewhere you can hopefully get some quiet time to work. Make sure that area is clear before you sit down to work.
  • If you’re flying solo with kids at home then there is no doubt it’s going to be a tough few months. Although schools aren’t yet closed, coronavirus may force them to close soon. So, accept that you are not going to be firing on all cylinders. Prioritise your work. Don’t book calls in consecutively, space them out. Avoid cabin fever by getting out for a walk at some point in the day. Don’t get hung up by mess or chores. They will get done just maybe not as quickly as you are used too.
  • Avoid social media whilst you are home working (unless you are a social media manager, then you just have to be super disciplined!). Social media can be very distracting and before you know it, you’ve wasted a significant amount of time. Turn OFF your notifications.
  • Check in with your team. Communication is key to efficient and productive home working. Preferably 3 times a week or more if you are full time. Use tools such as Zoom, Google Hangouts, Microsoft Teams, the good old telephone and Slack to keep lines of communication open. Perhaps establish reasonable hours of the day to communicate with each other so that nobody is expected to answer a call in the evening if that is deemed unreasonable.
  • Take a break. It’s ok to take a break. Especially if you are wrestling with kids at home too. Do work in bitesize chunks where possible, try to incorporate that into your planning.
  • If you are trying to homeschool as well as home working then be realistic. You cannot possibly achieve the same output as a full time school whilst working. Break up the day into school time and work time. However it works for you, but don’t (unless you have older kids who can study with little supervision) try to do both at the same time. Stick to shorter lessons and only one or two a day. Utilise resources such as Twinkl or check out this fabulous lady and read her advice: Erin Loechner OtherGoose.com. I also saw this useful list from a facebook group that may be worth checking out.
  • BACK UP YOUR WORK REGULARLY! 
  • Make sure you are adhering to data protection and security laws. Make sure you have the latest security software installed on your device. Ensure access to your device is password protected and encrypted to prevent unauthorised access if the device is stolen, misplaced or hacked. If you’re accessing your work network whilst home working, make sure access is secure. Check with your employer that they have covered this with your team.

Coronavirus may be disrupting our day to day life but we will get through this. It’s a challenge yes, but hopefully our communities will come together and work to support one another. Look after your elderly or vulnerable neighbours. We are strong and capable and work best when we work together.

Keep up to date with the NHS latest information and guidance on Coronavirus here. NHS

If you are responsible for a team or are a business trying to make remote working work for you, then our trusted friends Ursula Tavender and Liese Lord have put together this fab resource: Get it here.

Categories
Careers Flexible Working Parental

Getting Help to Return in Manchester

Are you a parent or carer in Greater Manchester, looking to return to paid work? Are you looking for support to find flexible jobs with family friendly or carer friendly employers?

Caring, Working, Living is a Greater Manchester project that supports people with caring responsibilities who are looking to return to paid employment (Returners) to increase their confidence and self-esteem in relation to returning to paid employment, and to improve their understanding of the skills that employers are looking for.

Returners are people who have taken at least a year out of work to undertake caring responsibilities for children, or elderly or sick relatives.

Caring, Working Living can:

  • Provide information to ‘Returners’ about agencies in their local area that provide support with job search skills.
  • Provide financial support towards the cost of job searching, for example towards the cost of childcare or other care; travel to an employment support activity; interview costs such as travel or clothing.
  • Provide information about employers that are offering coffee and chats; workplace visits; work trials; placements or Returnships as part of their recruitment.

If you have any questions about the project, please contact Vicky for more information.

Email: [email protected]

Phone: 0161 277 1044

Returners can refer themselves here: https://www.gmcvo.org.uk/caringworkingliving/returners

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CaringWorkingLiving

Categories
Careers Flexible Working

Flexible Working At Oxbotica

We Are Powered By Our People.

At Oxbotica we take great pride in our team. We create a space where everyone is welcome, heard, and celebrated for their strengths. We’re driven by challenge and a commitment to make our employees experience as dynamic and rewarding as we can.

Furthermore, as we build a global business together, we are steered by our experience, insight of an entire team and guided by strong and approachable leadership.

Oxbotica support a healthy work-life balance, in part by offering flexible working and plenty of social engagements open to the whole team. We regularly share our vision, targets and company updates with everyone, including remote workers. Oxbotica believe that an engaged workforce is more productive and positive.

As we grow internationally our values and culture are fundamental in keeping us on track and moving in the right direction. Therefore, our people embody these values. They trust us to provide strong leadership, a secure environment and opportunities for growth. We trust them to contribute their energy and expertise to move the business forward.

What Our Employees Say…

  • “If there is a problem to solve, I acknowledge that I don’t know everything – and I don’t try to know everything. Instead, I surround myself with the best people. I canvass opinions from the experts – my team – and pick the answer that gets the job done.”
  • “There is a real sense of community and a very healthy attitude towards things like flexible working. This honest environment encourages accountability and creates a safe space for opening up and asking questions.”
  • “The team is full of clever people. We embrace the challenge of scaling to a global company together”
  • “It’s easy to have a say – everyone wants your opinion.”

Join Oxbotica

Join the brains behind the software that lets every vehicle do more.

Changing the way we move people and goods takes talent, dedication and a united team. Our rapidly growing company includes world-class engineers, technical leaders and commercial masterminds, who are tackling exciting challenges collaboratively and creatively every day.

We develop technology that will touch on the operation of every industry across the globe. As a company we work to create a safer future for both people and the planet. Our team members are people that share our values and drive to make an impact, as we create the future of autonomy.

Flexibility

We create the conditions to help you do your best. Therefore, we do all we can to create opportunities for everyone regardless of personal circumstances. As part of this commitment, we offer a variety of flexible working arrangements including:

  • Part time working
  • Remote working
  • Extended parental leave
  • Unpaid sabbatical

We work 37.5 hours a week, Monday – Friday around core hours of 10:00 – 16:00. This is enough for most; but if you require any extra flexibility we will do what we can to support you.

To see our Current Vacancies click HERE

Categories
Flexible Working Lifestyle

WASPI Women.

I am one of those WASPI women.

Some of you may ask what one of those is. Sadly, in my case it is not an older, slim and gorgeous Helen Mirren type!!

A WASPI woman is a lady who reached their state pension age and sadly had their pension taken away from them with basically no warning.  How wrong you may all cry and then move on to the next article.

The reason it is so wrong, is that most of us did not have the time to put extra money in place to cover for what, for me, will be a 6 year shortfall.

I am not saying that I would have retired or even could have retired.

After 45 years of working I have paid my dues, including bringing up 3 children and never claimed benefits. Is this right or proper, I would question and my answer always comes back as a resounding NO.

I loved my years working. I was always in recruitment and HR though now due to personal health issues I find myself on the scrapheap fighting with the system, as no one wants to take a chance on this alleged old lady, which trust me, is no fun. 

I don’t have a fabulous trust fund or pot of gold (I have been chasing those rainbows!). So I have to work, as most people who are reading this will have to and your retirement date sadly will get further away the younger you are.

Trust me, plenty of us 60 plus ladies have a lot to give to the workplace, although we are often overlooked.

We don’t want to be the CEO anymore, or have the top job, we just want to work because we HAVE TO and in some cases want to!! We all added value when we were in the workplace, we can still do that – believe me.

So when you think about flexible working, don’t think part time think FLEXIBLE, think WASPI women. We are more than capable of adding huge value to your organisation.

I am lucky that Cheney Hamilton @ FindYourflex could see the value in me and my transferable skills.

So what I wanted to say to employers out there, is try looking beyond the usual recruitment paths, there is a wealth of experience out there and everyone needs to be valued.

See our years of experience and dedication, see our skills – NOT our age.

Barbara Ford , WASPI Account Executive, FindYourFlex.

Categories
Business Flexible Working Industry Flexers

We Found Our Flex …By Creating And Championing A Flexible Working Culture

Flexible and remote working. A guest blog from the team at RedWizard – Project, Change & Transformation Experts.

RedWizard And Flex

At RedWizard, we’re not just a team, we’re a strong community of remote and flexible workers. And we believe flexible working should be a basic human right. Why? Because, for the majority of people, it improves their overall health and wellbeing. It’s been proven to reduce stress and increase job satisfaction. Time spent on trains and buses can now be spent with family and friends. There’s more time for exercise, mindful meditation and preparing healthy food. It also means avoiding toxins like exhaust fumes when commuting. Not only that, it’s a cost-cutter with fewer travel expenses and work clothes required… and the list goes on! 

Flexible—It’s Not Just A Word, It’s One Of Our Core Values.

Being flexible is one of our core values–along with being bold, loyal, warm and quirky—they make us who we are and help us to create the future we want to experience. So, we’ve said goodbye to 9-5 and hello to a flexible future!

Control? We Hand It Over And Trust 

Our approach to creating a flexible working culture is to trust our people and hand over control. We focus on what’s being delivered—the outcome. How our people get there is completely up to them. We hire them to do a job, we give them control and don’t micromanage—in other words, we TRUST them! 

By taking this approach, the entire RedWizard community is driven, productive, innovative, passionate about their own work, and inspired by our collective vision and purpose-led mission. Challenges change and change challenges Implementing real flexibility and remote working has its challenges. But… like all businesses, we were born to change! And we take a very human approach. From technology to health and wellbeing, we work together to ensure the entire RedWizard community gets the support they need and remains connected. We do this by keeping pace with new technology and running weekly ‘Good to Connect’ meetings–giving everyone a chance to open up and share if they wish. We listen and care about each other. There’s always someone available for an online chat and a cuppa!

Benefits? You Bet… For Us And Our Clients

Our flexible culture has had a positive impact on the services we provide our clients and our own internal processes, functions and working lives. And having the ability to work in a way that’s right for us—on an individual basis—means we’ve time to live our lives in a meaningful way. We’re more creative, innovative and far more productive as a result. 

What Does It Mean For Our Clients?

Because we all work remotely our overhead is low. This means we can pass the savings on to our clients and remain competitive in the marketplace—making us small, but mighty. With a clear and proven methodology, which we call our Big Four—people, communications, insight, agility—we’re able to accommodate global working across different time zones, we just take time off during the day. 

Our business has gone from strength to strength over the past few years, and we believe our approach to remote and flexible working has played a major role. It’s enabled us to attract some exceptional talent—people who share our values and recognise the benefits of flexible and remote working. As a result, our numbers are growing, we’ve more interest in our services. And we’ve even been shortlisted for the Project Management Institute (PMI) UK National Project Awards, in the category of ‘PMO of the Year’. It’s an exciting time for us all. 

Hey, It Works For Us!

Flexible and remote working is a hot topic at the moment, and opinions across industries are uniting and dividing. Some say it’s great for health and wellbeing, others say it’s harmful. Some say it increases productivity, others say it’s too distracting. Whatever you want to believe, you’re bound to find something on the internet to back up your argument—although it may not always be supported by evidence! 

But… 

We can say with confidence, flexible and remote working has worked for us, is working for us, and will continue to work for us. We believe it’s the future—and should be a basic human right. We’ve more on this topic If you found our approach to flexible and remote working of interest, you may find some of our other articles on this subject of interest too. So please, join the conversation, visit our blog and feel free to like and share any of our articles.

Video: Hear how flexible and remote working impacts RedWizard’s founder and CEO, and online community.

RedWizard Your community of project, change and transformation experts.

Think of us as your very own project, change or transformation management office with decades of experience. We’ll help you identify the right support model for your business and help you evolve that model as your business changes. Our story

Red Wizard Consulting Logo, flexible and remote working supporters

Want to read more about the companies who are flying the flag for flexible working? Check these out…

Hilti – Helping You Find Your Flex

Royal London – Helping You Find Your Flex

Badenoch + Clark – The Rise Of The Flex Working, Flex Supporting Rec Cons

A HR Journey With Pitney Bowes

Categories
Business Careers Flexible Working

What Is Flexible Working?

The issue with answering this question is that flexible working means different things for different people. So many terms can describe types of flexible working and what works for one person could be totally off the table for another. 

However we will attempt to summarise ‘What Is Flexible Working’. 

Essentially it is a work pattern that accommodates the needs of the employee whilst maintaining the business needs of the company. It is a symbiotic relationship. You cannot have one without the other.

It can fall into a few different categories often with different names. The Find Your Flex Group use the 6 pillars.

The Six Pillars Of Flexible Working

  • FT Flexi Start & Finish TImes
  • Part Time
  • Remote Working
  • Compressed Hours
  • Job Share
  • Term Time Only

Flexi Start and Finish Times

Employees work allocated hours but can choose at what time to start and what time to finish. Many businesses make this work by having core hours that everyone has to be in for.

Part Time

Part time hours for those who can’t or don’t want to work full time. For this group of people it’s really important that are considered as important as their full time counterparts. Many part timers are just as ambitious as full timers.

Remote Working

Working in a location other than the main office. It could be at home or in a shared working environment.

Compressed Hours

Working an allocated number of hours across a compressed time period. For example full time over 4 days. Conversely, some may wish to work part time hours but over 5 days for example. Some employers choose to have a core day for meetings that everyone must be in for.

Job Share

A role that has the requirement for full time hours is split between 2 employees. It could be a 50:50 split or an alternative split such as 75:25.

Term Time Only

The required weekly / monthly hours are only worked during term time. Allowing parents to manage school holidays without the need to rely on paid help or favours.

There are so many benefits to facilitating these patterns of work. To read more, why not download our Tips To Implementing Flexible Working.

Flexible working is more frequently in the news today with campaigners such as Helen Whately, Joeli Braerly and Anna Whitehouse. In our next post we discuss the current state and future of flexible working.

Perhaps you are ready to #SignUpToFlex… Contact us today.

Categories
Business Flexible Working Industry Flexers Parental

Hilti, helping you Find|Your|Flex

Having worked in HR for over 15 years, I have seen a growing demand for employers to provide more flexible working practices. Employees want increasing flexibility for a variety of rea-sons and need different types of flexibility throughout their working lives. Many employers are keen to support this, however, often limit themselves to the statutory legal provisions and view flexibility in a very narrow way.

Flexible working options should not be limited to part-time working, it’s about considering the variety of choices employees need at different life stages and offering something for everyone. A well designed flexible working offering can make a significant difference to employee engagement and retention.

As Head of HRBP’s at Hilti, I’m part of a team that are striving to build a working environment and culture that stands-out amongst our peers as a ‘Great Place to Work’. Offering an outstanding flexible working approach is an important part of differentiating our culture. It also presents an opportunity to retain our fantastic workforce in a buoyant labour marker and to attract new talent to our organisation.

Prior to launching our new approach to flexible working in summer 2017, our policies were over-complicated and confusing. Applications for flexible working were low and only 3% of our workforce in GB worked in an altered way to their original contract. This was at odds with clear demand, evident through our employee engagement survey, that our people wanted more help to balance the demands between work and home life. Improving and simplifying our approach to flexible working provided an obvious solution to this gap.

Our new flexible working approach set out to simplify what we offered and identify new opportunities to expand our policy. The new options addressed the gaps in our existing approach. We introduced the right to request a sabbatical or career break of up to 12 months whilst pre-serving the contract and added the right to purchase an additional five days annual leave and to take one days’ paid emergency leave annually for unexpected personal situations.

Our family friendly provisions were already generous with 18 weeks fully paid for maternity leave and two months’ salary paid as a return to work bonus. But we wanted to do more for our dads, so increased paternity pay to two weeks at full pay and equalized pay arrangements in Shared Parental Leave.

To make sure our employees were made aware of their new offering we ran an internal campaign using the #Hiltiinmylife as we felt this perfectly reflected how we wanted our employees to balance their Hilti role with their lives.

This included a video message from our Northern Europe Region Head, to endorse his personal commitment to flexible working at Hilti, as well as some video case studies from team members who already enjoyed flexible working practices.

Flexible working at Hilti

Following the launch in July 2017, we received more applications in two months than the total received in the previous two years. And our journey didn’t end there – we have since introduced home working for suitable Head Office roles, offer a day’s leave for our team members who are moving house or getting married and also now offer up to three days’ paid leave for fertility treatment .

In 2019, we have also taken the next step to add more flexibility to our field-based sales roles by designing a role that can be done on a part-time basis without compromising customer relationships or making it harder to hit target. We truly believe that by embracing flexible working in all its forms, we will have highly engaged teams who will want to stay and be part of our ‘Great Place to Work’.

Kim Kerr

Head of HR Business Partnering

Hilti Great Britain

Categories
Business Careers Flexible Working Industry Flexers

Royal London helping you #FindYourFlex

“A career here doesn’t have to be to strive for CEO, you can go up, down and sideways if you wish. There are always opportunities. – Nicola Piercewright

“I have developed in every way possible. I am not the shy person I was. My confidence has been built up because of all the trust and support you get with senior leaders.” – Ellen Gibbon

Our customers and members matter to us, we work to please their needs, they are at the centre of everything we do.

This exceptional feedback comes from the brilliant work our Operations team do day in day out:

You are made to feel valued and in this day and age that is very rare. I hope they keep these values and traditions going for many years to come.”

Our award-winning customer service and our mutuality means we can give customers that little bit more, and you can trust us to be there for you when it counts.

People have been at the heart of all that is great about Royal London for more than 150 years and we are looking to maintain this with by adding Customer Service Consultants to our team in Wilmslow.

We have a range of full-time (35 hours) and part-time (minimum 18 hours) roles available between Monday to Friday 08.00 – 18.00 and we are open to discussing working patterns that work for you.

We asked of current Customer Service Consultants why they love working and Royal London and they were more than happy to share their views.

“The opportunities to grow, develop and further your career from starting in customer services are massive and development is a huge focus of Royal London.” – Leighanne Dixon

“The best part of my job is working in a fantastic team of people and helping our customers.”  – Joshua Dewitt

We asked Nicola Piercewright some further questions on her career with us

What is the most rewarding part of your role?

Giving our customers the best possible experience and helping them to help themselves with regards to their financial decisions. I know I am making a difference.

How have you developed since joining?

My journey has been long (I have been here 19 years!) at Royal London and my priorities over the years have changed, but if I can come in to work (even Part-time) and make a difference then that’s development right there. I develop each and every day here….from change in legislation and knowing what is required, change in management, from Team managers to CEO. I believe I have developed into a well-rounded person willing to live the values Royal London requires; Empowerment, Trustworthy, Collaborate, and Achieve.

Would you recommend your division to others?

Yes most definitely. Why, because you are valued here, if you come with the right attitude to provide excellent customer service and bring an open mind to enable change for the better then you will have a happy career here. And a career here doesn’t have to be to strive for CEO you can go up, down and sideways if you wish. There are always opportunities.

Our customers are diverse and to continually meet their needs we are looking for people from all backgrounds to join us, bring new thinking, challenge ours and add value daily.

So regardless what sector you have operated in, we want to discuss aligning our expertise and your passion.

Join us here – https://jobs.findyourflex.co.uk/clients/royal-london