Categories
Business Careers Output Recruitment Working Culture

Employment, how long do people stay in jobs for?

The answer is not long. Employment has been hit hard over the last couple of years for sure. The impact of Brexit, the Pandemic now a cost of living crisis; it’s no wonder how many people’s careers have been affected.

So what has been the effect? We conducted a poll on LinkedIn and Facebook where people shared with Find Your Flex how long they have been in their current role.

Grass growing under foot? Chance would be a fine thing!

That pretty much sums it up. Out of all our respondents only 11.5% have been in a job for 5 or more years.

Now, it’s not uncommon for people to not want to stay in one job for too long. Or they may even be talented enough to move up the employment ladder quickly.

However, over 11% is alarmingly low especially when you consider the last two years worth of lockdowns. In the height of a pandemic it’s highly unlikely most people outside that margin left their jobs for a promotion or a better offer.

Is there an Employment issue?

When 27.9% have been employed for less than a year? And the same amount of people claimed they had only been employed in their current role between 1-2 years totaling almost a 56% all together. I would say so.

As this implies that the turnover for employers must be high. As employment lasting only 2 years or less cannot be considered normal.

Especially when half of those numbers are within the last 12 months where we have had no lockdowns. Furthermore, according to our Prime Minister employment is at an all time high!

This is further supported by job vacancy numbers which reached a record high between February and April.

The number of job vacancies in February to April 2022 rose to a new record of 1,295,000; an increase of 33,700 from the previous quarter and an increase of 499,300 from the pre-coronavirus.

So clearly there is an employment issue because these stats don’t add up… or do they?

High Employment + Short Range Job Longevity = Widening Pay Gap

A couple of weeks ago, I read an article on the BBC that reported the pay gap between bosses and staff is widening.

And just like that, everything makes sense! Stats that show employment is at an all time high. The majority of people in our polls saying they have held a job for less than 2 years, this is the end result and it makes sense.

How does that work? Well look at it this way: if an entry level employee joins a company how long does it take them to really start working their way up the company ladder, a year or 2? And how many more years before they have really progressed within the organisation?

The problem is; from our stats paired with government research, people are not in the role long enough to really climb the ladder. Whether the working culture is so bad employees leave by choice or they are let go by the company.

Either way that usually means they will be starting a similar role in another organisation. Probably around the same level of the role they left and on a similar rate of pay…

Yet little changes for the business (in the short term), they quickly replace the staff they have lost with new eager workers. Then in the next 6 to 24 months they repeat the process. Productivity is maintained.

There is little-to-no cost in promoting staff to higher paid, yet business and profits may continue to grow and therefore higher executive salaries increase. And this could be one reason why the gap is widening.

Yes the employment rate is great, but the wages are low and during a cost of living crisis that’s a huge employment problem. And it can result in severe consequences for businesses operating this way.

What is the impact for Businesses?

No good ever came from a company having a high attrition rate. It signals to three vital components of business; job seekers, target audiences and potential partners that they do not value staff.

It is never long before high staff turnover leads to a bad business reputation and raises flags for the aforementioned parties. Job seekers do their research, if they see employees don’t last long and why; they won’t want to work for an employer like that.

The same goes for potential business partners, in a society that is focusing more on the way staff are treated, companies won’t want to be guilty by association. Or partner with organisations whose values do not align with their own.

Productivity may be maintained in the short term through eager new employees wanting to impress. But this will ebb away when managers and other employees grow demoralised by having no consistent team and the constant need for training. Then you will see the quality of service decrease.

The Great Resignation and The Big Quit

Now this may come across laying the blame at the door of businesses. That wouldn’t be totally fair; brexit, the pandemic, the current cost of living crisis, these have had an effect on employers and they have had to make tough decisions.

Many businesses have struggled to weather these storms and are now trying to recover, which is not easy. However, the grace period where understanding of companies having high attrition as a result of lockdowns is quickly coming to an end. It will soon be an unacceptable excuse as to why businesses can’t or rather won’t retain staff.

Last year we talked about the ‘Great Resignation’ where employees where seriously considering quitting their role at the time. That seem to have happened if we look at the results of our polls.

This year I have read about a similar movement called ‘The Big Quit’ with employees having similar intentions.

And with job vacancies being at a record high it shows they are following through (although of course the government puts the positive spin on that as a high growth.)

Employees are making their positions clear; provide opportunities or they will look elsewhere and businesses can’t afford to not respond.

The ‘Mutable’ Solution

That’s not as simple as businesses saying “okay we’ll start promoting, raising salaries and providing more flexible working”. That’s neither practical nor sustainable to do all at once.

But there is a solution, one that solves this problem in the present and future. Businesses need to start aiming to become ‘Mutable’.

What is ‘Mutable’? It means being in a stage of constant transformation. Where rather than businesses competing with others they constantly compete with themselves.

This starts with having staff work to an output model rather than an hourly rate. This would especially work well for companies struggling with high attrition.

By buying into a shared workforce, a company can have employees complete weekly tasks and once they are finished the employees have the ability to earn even more elsewhere. Which would fix the turnover issue.

The future of employment, the future of working and the future of business is vastly different from the present. The future is ‘Mutable’. For more information on starting your Mutable journey click here.

Categories
Careers Flexible Working Output Recruitment

The 3 Ts of Productivity – Task, Time and the One that Everyone Forgets About

We generate endless to-do lists for our work and personal lives.

Tasks are logged.

Calendars ensure we do not embarrassingly double book. The latest apps are available with features to mark milestones and keep us on track.

So why are we not always as efficient as we could be? Because tasks and time are not the only part of the productivity mix.

The missing ingredient

We overlook the element that smashes our procrastination, slays our negative thoughts and rejuvenates our weariness. Louis Pasteur, whom we have to thank for immunizations and pasteurized milk, once stated,

Let me tell you the secret that has led to my goal. My strength lies solely in my tenacity.

Tenacity is the incredible ability to carry on in the face of challenges, the force that brings us our hard-won triumphs. If the road seems endless and we are running on empty, it is the stubbornness to persist that’s the real driver of success. But the problem with tenacity is that we do not have it all of the time. Levels fluctuate and sometimes erratically.

What eating radishes teaches us

There is no limitless well of tenacity in the same way that there is no infinite source of energy (we all need to sleep).

In the now infamous cookie test, Roy Baumeister placed two groups of volunteers in a room with a batch of tempting, delicious-smelling cookies and some radishes. One group could eat the yummy cookies whilst the other could only munch on the tangy and comparatively less satisfying veg. After a while, the volunteers were given complex tests. The group that had to resist the cookies gave up on problems more easily.

The take-away from this experiment, asserts Baumeister, is that the radish participants used up a part of their store of mental energy in resisting the sweet treats. Their willpower or tenacity was depleted.

A state of mind and a muscle

Tenacity may be seen not solely a state of mind to be summoned at will but a muscle that, when over-used, gets tired and drained. This is a factor that impacts on the productivity of one’s work and personal life. So, what changes can be made?

Top 5 techniques to turbocharge your tenacity

1. Goal focus – It’s inevitable that we have to face up to energy zapping tasks. You may need to chase invoices – again. Despondency sets in. But think instead that this is just one more step to your objective of having as successful business. When things can get dreary, overarching goals are motivators. Seeing the bigger picture will help you get through the smaller, arduous tasks.

2. What is this costing me? – you may put off tasks or do them slowly or less effectively. Ask yourself what this approach is costing you. Energy? Time loss? An unhappy state of mind? Is this the way you want things to be? In order to avoid these negativities, a tenacity boost can perk you up. Sticks are as much motivators as carrots.

3. Flexibility – flexible working has myriad advantages and one of these is being able to fit in your work around your mood. You can move tasks around when you are best able to do them or when you have the most energy to go full pelt. Reschedule for potential.

4. Learn from the past – Think back to all those times when you felt you couldn’t do something but did it anyway. What were the triggers that kept you going? Consider the qualities that you demonstrated at that point and heed them. Those characteristics have not disappeared, even though it feels that way sometimes, and they are still a part of you. Think about your qualities.

5. Quick fixes – There are various ways to encourage tenacity to take root even if you feel overwhelmed. Practising mindfulness soothes a jittering mind. Relaxation techniques ease tension out of the body and they only take a few minutes. A short but brisk cardio-pumping walk cracks stagnation. Devise your own tenacity playlist and turn up the volume on music that is pitch perfect for you.

Does it really work in practice?

From the whole Find Your Flex team, the answer to that question is a resounding “yes!”. We operate completely flexibly and are encouraged to engage when suits us best. We adopt an output based attitude rather than concentrating on set hours and rigid employment structures. This is an empowering approach for us all to reach our targets but in our own personal and most effective way. We have tried it and we can say that it works.

Your mental power tool is tenacity

Task and time remain the building blocks for effective diary management. You absolutely need to define what needs to be done and how long it will take – especially if you are charging yourself and your skills out to make a profit. Nonetheless it is possible to alter your mindset to give it a boost and replenish your reserves.

To enhance your own “Output” and to get more out of your day, use ways to tap into your tenacity.

It is an oft forgotten innate power tool – One that you can use to drill deep for success.

Categories
Business Careers Future of work Interviews And CV's Recruitment

Salaries In Job Descriptions: Candidates want Employers to be Upfront

Find Your Flex is a platform with a purpose. And that purpose is to build a better future of work for all. Today we are discussing salaries in job descriptions!

Recently we conducted a poll on various social media platforms on the inclusion of stated salaries in job descriptions. The response was overwhelming.

We asked the question: “If a Salary isn’t stated on a Job Description does it put you off?

The post went viral, reaching over 100,000 views and over 4,100 people voted. 84% of people who voted said; yes they would be put off by a job description that does not state a salary.

Many of the voters supplied their reasons why and we noticed a particular pattern forming.

No Time for Time Wasters

It usually puts me off entirely. If the job sounds like a particularly good fit and I enter a discussion with a recruiter about it, the salary range is the first question I’ll ask. If the recruiter won’t give me the salary range at the start, I’ll politely end the call there as I don’t want to waste my time.

The most prominent reason given for why people would be put off applying, was that they didn’t want to waste time.

Supplementary to that was that most people apply for jobs that will continue to facilitate their lifestyle needs.

Applicants don’t want to waste their time applying. Only to find out further down the line that the salary will not sufficiently meet their needs.

How can you make a decision about viability of changing a role/ company if you can’t equate whether you could continue to afford to live your existence?

Applicants also see this as a lack of respect in valuing their time. Or even shows ignorance about the amount of time and effort candidates put into their job applications.

If a candidate really wants a role they can spend hours catering their CV and covering letter specifically to that role and company.

Why should you spend the time and energy polishing a resume, applying, stressing, interviewing, waiting…just to find the salary range is something you would have never applied for in the first place?

Salaries in job descriptions – a lack of transparency results in a lack of trust

Good candidates who pull out are less likely to apply to the organisation again and more likely to share their experience with their connections.

No company should ever underestimate the power of word of mouth.

It only takes one applicant to have a bad experience during the recruitment process for this to snowball. Social Networking and Social Media is a huge part of our daily lives.

All it takes is one post by an applicant with the right social connections to spread the word about how poor an employer’s recruitment process is.

I somehow always get the impression that these companies are looking for the highest skilled employee who ticks all the right boxes whom they can then insult by offering as little as possible for their services.

This all contributes to a company’s brand reputation. When it is clear that one aspect of the business has a negative reputation, it starts a domino effect in the eyes of the public. It’s clear to see their train of thought:

If a company has poor recruitment, they must be a poor employer. If they’re a poor employer, the service can’t be great. If the service isn’t great I should take my custom elsewhere.

Even in its simplest form, if you’re not being open about yourselves as an employer, why should candidates trust you?

Believe you are good and fair employer? Then literally put your money/salaries where your mouth is so candidates will know it!

If you are proud of what you pay your people you will have no problem, putting this out.

Don’t play games with people’s livelihoods

What puts me off is when the recruiter asks what salary you expect. I just reply, asking what the company is offering. You can’t beat around the bush… it gets you nowhere and does no one any favours in the long run … Be up front and don’t treat it like a game. Life is too short!!

Even if salaries are negotiable, a range between the minimum and maximum should be advertised to show applicants where they stand.

And once those negotiations begin, both parties need to be forthcoming about what their expectations are to meet a certain salary.

This is important as salaries can also help an applicant determine their level of seniority.

The ludicrous requirements for even the most junior roles make it difficult to determine the seniority, in a way that salary absolutely defines.

In negotiating anything, both sides need to be aware of the stakes. A candidate needs to know what it is they are negotiating for. It is better to state a salary in the job description than make applicants struggle to negotiate in the dark. This is just another form of playing games.

And its important that the employer is not considered a dictator, as this once again impacts their reputation. If the salary is negotiable, both parties must have something to negotiate with.

“Negotiating power lies with the employer if a salary isn’t listed. Whilst you can negotiate during the final stage of interviews, you should at least see salary expectations and that your potential employer has done some research into the role before you apply.

Just ticking a recruitment box?

It makes me feel like the recruiter is just trying to collect CVs to stick in a database and tick a box.”

This may not be just about salary. A lack of effort and details in a job description will be a sure sign to any applicant that the employer is not overly interested in the quality of the applicant.

But it is clear that to some applicants, an unstated salary is a red flag that employers do not care about the application and are just ticking a HR box.

Thus sending a message that employers don’t care enough to put in the research of the role they are recruiting for. And what the standard salary is for such a role.

If you don’t advertise a salary then for me it says to a potential applicant is these guys are potentially looking to do this on the cheap or have no idea about the marketplace and so can’t even pitch a salary for the role.”

It can also show a poor HR department or recruiter. As top quality candidates who know their value will be looking out for a salary. These will be less likely to apply for the role.

Where an abundance of perhaps under-qualified candidates will be in their place resulting in hours of sifting through applications.

“It usually means HR and hiring managers spending unnecessary time sifting through more CV’s and interviewing candidates that if they discover the salary is too low will pull out.”

Salaries in job descriptions: The candidates have spoken. Now employers must listen

The response was loud and clear. The general theme that employers have a responsibility to state salaries in their job descriptions cannot be ignored.

If employers continue to omit such crucial information from the job description they not only risk losing potentially amazing recruits, but could be doing substantial damage to their brand reputation.

To conclude, its not difficult to state a salary in job description, even if its a range between the minimum and the maximum, at least then everyone knows where they stand. The only one that stands to miss out on not stating a salary is the employer.

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