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Flexible Working

Flexible Working Appeal – How to Make a Convincing Flex Request

Flexible working is undergoing a paradigm shift. Cued by the Covid pandemic, several businesses are leaning towards a more agile format. Tech giants are trailblazing and high-street brands are following suit. But many employers remain hesitant about flex. Perhaps because it was presented during lockdown in its most dystopian manner – stressful, isolated and juggled in with home-schooling. How do you convince a doubtful boss about the long-term benefits of flex?

What procedure?

You may make a statutory flexible working request if you meet the requirements. Alternatively, you may submit an informal request. For more information on your legal rights, check out www.acas.org.uk and www.gov.uk. Whichever route you choose, you will still have to sell your idea.

Slice it up

Too often people think that the default is to go part-time. There are myriad options out there and you may find that full-time but with core or staggered hours is actually more feasible. Slice up your working life and see what kind of flex will suit each part of it. For example, you could do compressed hours in conjunction with home-working. Be as creative as you can, so that you can present your employer with as many realistic alternatives as possible.

Gather evidence of Flexible Working

A case is only as good as its evidence. Check whether your employer has a flexible working policy in its handbook and use that as a starting point. To boost your request, you could gather case-studies which relate directly to your job position which demonstrate successful examples of flex working. The strongest argument against “it can’t be done” is to show, exactly and concretely, how it is being done. You may also gather statistics about flex and the corresponding impact on productivity in your industry.

Sell your business model

Our reasons for flex-working are deeply rooted because they impact on such important areas of life such as health, family or identity. But this is not the time to present a purely personal case or one that deals solely with generalities. By all means, emphasise the positive outcomes for you but that it only half the story. We all acknowledge that there are many advantages associated with homeworking. There is less stress, less time lost commuting, less pressure on public transport and a positive impact on the environment. However, your employer still has a business to run, as well as a profit and loss account to balance.

Get specific. Anticipate every push-back your employer can make and come up with a persuasive solution. If you work from home on Thursdays and there is a scheduled team meeting that day, offer to link in via Zoom.
Talk up the benefits to the employer of offering flexibility. If you work remotely full-time, your boss could save money on renting commercial office space. If business is brisk at the start of the week but sluggish later on, you could offer to do more hours on Monday in return for an early departure on Friday.


Flex back

Flexibility is two-way street. If your employer is willing to let you flex, be prepared to do the same in return. When there is an away day that usually falls on your at-home time, still turn up. If there is a sudden temporary upsurge in work, pitch in by logging on in the evening for example (although be vigilant that this does not settle into a permanent pattern). This approach not only builds strong businesses, it also promotes goodwill and fruitful professional relationships. Check out why staying connected while remote working important and how you can best state your case to your employer how it will work for them.

Schedule a Flexible Working trial period

Employers may well be sceptical about whether flex working will actually deliver and this uneasiness can lead them to turn down requests. To combat this hesitancy, offer a trial period to see how it pans out. If there are difficulties, use this experience as an opportunity to iron them out in a proactive manner.
Flex Appeal. Have you got it?

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Flexible Working Press Release

The Find Your Flex Group Launches To Meet Growing Demand For Flexible Working

The Result Of Success

Following the exponential success of multi-award winning recruitment websites – mummyjobs.co.uk and daddyjobs.co.uk – the founders are launching FindYourFlex.co.uk. This also involves the rebranding the Mummyjobs Group to The Find Your Flex Group on 1 March 2019.  This move is to provide an inclusive platform for anyone looking for flexible working.

Cheney Hamilton launched Mummyjobs in 2017. This was fuelled by her own personal circumstances when she was unable to return to the 9-5 after the birth of her second baby.  Shocked by her employer’s unwillingness to offer flexibility, she quickly discovered it was a nationwide problem. It wasn’t just parents affected either, but a staggeringly large group of people. This included graduates to grandparents, who were looking for flexible work.

Cheney says “My own personal situation prompted me to set up mummyjobs.co.uk. However it quickly became clear that there’s a much bigger demand for flexible working across the labour market. Just after the initial launch, we went viral and over 1.2million people engaged with us over a 10-day period, searching or in support of flexible work.

Times have changed and so has the labour market.  We have five generations in the workforce. Generation Z are opting for work over University. We have the Gig economy and a 24/7 international community powered by technology. The traditional 9-5 is fast becoming a way of the past.  The demand for flexible working is clearly out there. Employers need to consider this when looking for the best talent.”

The New Job Board

The new job board (jobs.findyourflex.co.uk) offers a wide range of roles across all sectors from causal work to senior appointments.  All champion flexible working. It could be part-time, job-share, compressed hours, annualised hours, staggered hours, term-time only or phased retirement. The site also continues to share practical advice and provide a platform for people to share their experiences relating to flexible working. The Mummyjobs and Daddyjobs sites remain but will become campaigning sites for parental rights, closing the gender pay gap and equal leave benefits.

Cheney continues “This feels like a major turning point for the recruitment industry.  We’re working with small niche companies right through to big blue chip brands. I predict that many more employers will realise that flexibility needs to become a requisite part of their employment strategy. Failure to do so could lead to them missing or losing the best candidates for the role.”