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Salaries In Job Descriptions: Candidates want Employers to be Upfront

Find Your Flex is a platform with a purpose. And that purpose is to build a better future of work for all. Today we are discussing salaries in job descriptions!

Recently we conducted a poll on various social media platforms on the inclusion of stated salaries in job descriptions. The response was overwhelming.

We asked the question: “If a Salary isn’t stated on a Job Description does it put you off?

The post went viral, reaching over 100,000 views and over 4,100 people voted. 84% of people who voted said; yes they would be put off by a job description that does not state a salary.

Many of the voters supplied their reasons why and we noticed a particular pattern forming.

No Time for Time Wasters

It usually puts me off entirely. If the job sounds like a particularly good fit and I enter a discussion with a recruiter about it, the salary range is the first question I’ll ask. If the recruiter won’t give me the salary range at the start, I’ll politely end the call there as I don’t want to waste my time.

The most prominent reason given for why people would be put off applying, was that they didn’t want to waste time.

Supplementary to that was that most people apply for jobs that will continue to facilitate their lifestyle needs.

Applicants don’t want to waste their time applying. Only to find out further down the line that the salary will not sufficiently meet their needs.

How can you make a decision about viability of changing a role/ company if you can’t equate whether you could continue to afford to live your existence?

Applicants also see this as a lack of respect in valuing their time. Or even shows ignorance about the amount of time and effort candidates put into their job applications.

If a candidate really wants a role they can spend hours catering their CV and covering letter specifically to that role and company.

Why should you spend the time and energy polishing a resume, applying, stressing, interviewing, waiting…just to find the salary range is something you would have never applied for in the first place?

Salaries in job descriptions – a lack of transparency results in a lack of trust

Good candidates who pull out are less likely to apply to the organisation again and more likely to share their experience with their connections.

No company should ever underestimate the power of word of mouth.

It only takes one applicant to have a bad experience during the recruitment process for this to snowball. Social Networking and Social Media is a huge part of our daily lives.

All it takes is one post by an applicant with the right social connections to spread the word about how poor an employer’s recruitment process is.

I somehow always get the impression that these companies are looking for the highest skilled employee who ticks all the right boxes whom they can then insult by offering as little as possible for their services.

This all contributes to a company’s brand reputation. When it is clear that one aspect of the business has a negative reputation, it starts a domino effect in the eyes of the public. It’s clear to see their train of thought:

If a company has poor recruitment, they must be a poor employer. If they’re a poor employer, the service can’t be great. If the service isn’t great I should take my custom elsewhere.

Even in its simplest form, if you’re not being open about yourselves as an employer, why should candidates trust you?

Believe you are good and fair employer? Then literally put your money/salaries where your mouth is so candidates will know it!

If you are proud of what you pay your people you will have no problem, putting this out.

Don’t play games with people’s livelihoods

What puts me off is when the recruiter asks what salary you expect. I just reply, asking what the company is offering. You can’t beat around the bush… it gets you nowhere and does no one any favours in the long run … Be up front and don’t treat it like a game. Life is too short!!

Even if salaries are negotiable, a range between the minimum and maximum should be advertised to show applicants where they stand.

And once those negotiations begin, both parties need to be forthcoming about what their expectations are to meet a certain salary.

This is important as salaries can also help an applicant determine their level of seniority.

The ludicrous requirements for even the most junior roles make it difficult to determine the seniority, in a way that salary absolutely defines.

In negotiating anything, both sides need to be aware of the stakes. A candidate needs to know what it is they are negotiating for. It is better to state a salary in the job description than make applicants struggle to negotiate in the dark. This is just another form of playing games.

And its important that the employer is not considered a dictator, as this once again impacts their reputation. If the salary is negotiable, both parties must have something to negotiate with.

“Negotiating power lies with the employer if a salary isn’t listed. Whilst you can negotiate during the final stage of interviews, you should at least see salary expectations and that your potential employer has done some research into the role before you apply.

Just ticking a recruitment box?

It makes me feel like the recruiter is just trying to collect CVs to stick in a database and tick a box.”

This may not be just about salary. A lack of effort and details in a job description will be a sure sign to any applicant that the employer is not overly interested in the quality of the applicant.

But it is clear that to some applicants, an unstated salary is a red flag that employers do not care about the application and are just ticking a HR box.

Thus sending a message that employers don’t care enough to put in the research of the role they are recruiting for. And what the standard salary is for such a role.

If you don’t advertise a salary then for me it says to a potential applicant is these guys are potentially looking to do this on the cheap or have no idea about the marketplace and so can’t even pitch a salary for the role.”

It can also show a poor HR department or recruiter. As top quality candidates who know their value will be looking out for a salary. These will be less likely to apply for the role.

Where an abundance of perhaps under-qualified candidates will be in their place resulting in hours of sifting through applications.

“It usually means HR and hiring managers spending unnecessary time sifting through more CV’s and interviewing candidates that if they discover the salary is too low will pull out.”

Salaries in job descriptions: The candidates have spoken. Now employers must listen

The response was loud and clear. The general theme that employers have a responsibility to state salaries in their job descriptions cannot be ignored.

If employers continue to omit such crucial information from the job description they not only risk losing potentially amazing recruits, but could be doing substantial damage to their brand reputation.

To conclude, its not difficult to state a salary in job description, even if its a range between the minimum and the maximum, at least then everyone knows where they stand. The only one that stands to miss out on not stating a salary is the employer.

Categories
Business

How To Write A Good Job Description

We don’t need to tell you how important first impressions are, and a job description is the first introduction potential hires will get into your company. So, never underestimate its importance. 

A good job description should be straightforward, clear and easy to follow. It’s essentially the first stage of the recruitment process, so it plays a very important role in gathering a group of potential candidates. Take the time to get it right.

Here’s Some Of Our Top Tips To Write The Perfect Job Description:

The Job Title 

Make sure the job title is an accurate description of what the job entails. Think of it as an attention-grabbing headline. It’s what will draw the candidate in, so it’s arguably the most prominent point. Avoid obscure titles; job descriptions are not the place for creative writing, doing so you risk alienating people, meaning you could lose out on the perfect candidate. Think about the job titles people will search for.

Explain The Position

Paint a picture of your company, the team and the types of projects they’ll be working on.  It’s important to get the balance right here; you don’t want to waffle but you do want to provide enough information, so that the potential hire can engage with it. Too little info and your description could be overlooked. Too much and the candidate will lose interest or overlook important points.

The Working Environment

Be sure to talk about the working environment, so that potential hires can visualise themselves within it, whether that’s quirky offices based in Camden, an industrial centre, a call centre or a home-based role. Will it be quiet or noisy and full of buzz? Will the employee need to operate any equipment as part of the role or do any heavy lifting? Is travel required? These details let the candidate know what to expect and whether the job is a good match for them. 

Location & Flexibility 

Being clear about the location of the role is really important. It sounds obvious, but lack of clarity could eliminate the perfect hire.  State the geographical location of the role, but if you would consider flexibility and remote-working, spell this out. Thanks to technology and the way the world works these days, location doesn’t need to be a barrier to finding your perfect hire. 

Similarly, state if you’re open to flexible working patterns and discussions, so that it doesn’t become a sticking point for candidates at interview stage. But, be sure you are equipped to follow through with these promises of adopting flexible working practices.

Focus On Skills In The Job Description

Spell out the top three to four skills you expect your candidates to have. These are the key ingredients to the role and the bare minimum that’s required.  Missing one of these is like missing a key ingredient from a recipe.

Qualifications And Education

Don’t underestimate the importance of qualifications and education; it needs careful consideration. It’s clearly important to have the “must haves” in your description but be careful not to include something that would be an advantage, unless of course you highlight it as that. If you’d happily consider someone who has years or practical experience, spell this out in your description. 

Day-To-Day Duties

Candidates will want to know what their work life would look like on a daily basis, so explain the day-to-day duties of the job. Make sure this important point is included in the job description.

Success 

Tell your potential candidates what’s expected of them and what success looks like in your company. What standards will they be expected to meet if you bring them on board. 

Salary In The Job Description

Include the compensation package in the job description, even if it’s a range or salary band. “Salary dependant on experience” won’t generate the same amount of interest.  From a candidate’s point of view, no mention of salary, implies that the employer either doesn’t know or doesn’t value the outputs the role produces.  Why would they waste their time applying for a role that could possibly pay way under what they feel they should earn? Consequently qualified candidates who are potentially the right fit for the role could dismiss the role. 

Other Points To Keep In Mind When Writing A Job Description

Keep language friendly and gender-neutral, write in the first person e.g. “You will be proficient in…”, proof-read and spell check. 

When you write a job description read it out loud and ensure it makes sense. If there’s any point that doesn’t flow properly or is tricky to understand it, change it. If you don’t understand it, no-one else will.  Test the description; ask people in your business or organisation to read it before it goes live. Chances are that someone else, who is not as close to it as you are, will spot something you won’t!

Avoid long paragraphs and lengthy descriptions, candidates will lose interest. Keep the job description clear, concise and spell out the main points.

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